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Police Scotland confirm received report into historic child abuse within football

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6 hours ago, harry handsome said:

Horrible horrible bastard of a club, i cannot for the life of me work out how honest journalists are not pulling this apart.

I think the standard response to all journalists who have a go at Rangers should be - if you were/are a real journalist how is your journalistic investigation going into the largest scandal to hit world football.

I reckon it puts them on the spot, no bad language no personal comments just ask the question in a responsible manner.

Its a gift, an open goal for anyone worth their salt to publish, the facts have been around for many years its a join the dots ffs.

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42 minutes ago, magic8ball said:

I drove past the Jock Stein centre in Hamilton yesterday .thought to myself how long can that building continue to be named after a guy that knew so much and did nothing to stop further cases of abuse .

When he kicked Torbett out did he really think that it was over and Torbett wouldn't try and abuse elsewhere .

Same with them all that knew .They allowed others to carry on abusing getting their evil kicks and ruining lives 

Change it to the Davie Cooper centre I say

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Lifted from the gherald. I wonder which team this ‘neutral’ reporter Alison McConnell supports??

Sweep fucking sweep

 

17th May

celtic may be legally absolved of connection to the celtic Boys' Club sex abuse scandal . . . but morally they owe a great deal to victims

THERE are few sportswriters who escape the rush to hyperbole when describing moments of extreme emotion that sport throws up.

Who hasn’t written of the "tragedy" of a particular result? Of the "devastation" of players after a defeat particularly hard to stomach?

When confronted with the grim reality of what tragedy looks like beyond the parameters of a football pitch, a rugby field, an athletics track, there are no words left to do justice to the emotional pain and desolation felt when hearing the true horrors of sexual abuse.

This week’s conviction of Jim McCafferty, a former kitman for celtic, Hibernian and Falkirk, is a reminder that the current scandal has its tentacles particularly entwined with the Parkhead side because of their historic connections with celtic Boys’ Club, and it won’t disappear any time soon. Nor should it.

First and foremost, what has come shockingly to light about the predatory nature of what was going on in the underbelly of celtic Boys’ Club up until the mid-1990s is odious. To manipulate and exploit the dreams and ambitions of young men in order to satiate perverse sexual gratification is beyond comprehension.

Those words that are the building blocks of our trade seem inadequate to convey the magnitude and depth of how lives were irrevocably destroyed. Alcoholism and deep depression are the recurring threads that run through the stories of the victims, emotional pain that is so entrenched to appear impervious to any balm offered.

But what is equally unfathomable is the glee with which opponents of celtic have relished this latest conviction. The depravity of the acts themselves stand alone but the gloating engendered by these tragedies is in its own way despicable. Child sex abuse as a form of one-upmanship offers a bilious impression of those who wish to point fingers.

And increasingly what is becoming lost in the noise is the voice of the victims.

There are few remnants left of the mess that Fergus McCann inherited when he took over the club in 1994 and prevented celtic from going bankrupt. As a plc, celtic are unrecognisable from top to bottom from those days when the Kellys and the Whites came close to running it into the ground.

But this current scandal is arguably the most visceral issue that the board have had to deal with. It’s incumbent upon the members to recognise that fact.

Legally celtic Boys’ Club had no formal affiliation with celtic Football Club. They were, officially, two different clubs.

But – and it’s a big but – for the children whose lives were left broken and damaged by what they experienced, there was no such differentiation. Their accounts suggest an intricate weaving of the two clubs. The ultimate carrot waved in front of them, and their parents, was that the boys’ club provided a pathway to the celtic first team.

That the boys’ club had regular access to celtic Park, and its pitch rentals were said to have been paid for by celtic, would have strengthened the belief that this was a feeder organisation for the senior side.

An 1986 celtic View editorial was printed by a national newspaper yesterday and cast doubt on the club’s current stance that it was unaware of allegations surrounding some of the boys’ club coaching staff until the mid-90s.

In December, when disgraced former boys’ club coach Jim Torbett was convicted, celtic paused for two days before releasing a statement. It expressed “deep regret” but did not go so far as to offer an apology; to do so would be an admission of liability ahead of potential legal action.

Their statement acknowledged celtic’s history with celtic Boys’ Club but reiterated the stance that there was no formal connection between the two.

It might legally be so, but there is a moral obligation to offer some compensation for those who bought into the dream that pulling on a celtic Boys’ Club shirt would be the gateway to walking out of the celtic tunnel one day.

There are no words adequate to offer any victim of child sexual abuse as consolation. There are no glib soundbites, no slick and clever rhetoric that can compensate for how their lives were affected by what they experienced. An acknowledgement that it has happened and an acknowledgement of their genuine distress is a step in the right direction.

Paedophile Torbett and his accomplice Frank Cairney, both coaches, have been jailed for sexual offences spanning more than 20 years. A third celtic Boys’ Club coach, Gerald King, 66, was convicted of sexual offences against children at a school in Glasgow. Earlier this year he was given a three-year probation order.

Throughout this ordeal – and it has been a life sentence for the victims involved – celtic have kept their distance. There may well be legal absolution over their role.

Moral absolution is not so forthcoming

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28 minutes ago, SpidermansGaffer said:

Lifted from the gherald. I wonder which team this ‘neutral’ reporter Alison McConnell supports??

Sweep fucking sweep

 

17th May

celtic may be legally absolved of connection to the celtic Boys' Club sex abuse scandal . . . but morally they owe a great deal to victims

THERE are few sportswriters who escape the rush to hyperbole when describing moments of extreme emotion that sport throws up.

Who hasn’t written of the "tragedy" of a particular result? Of the "devastation" of players after a defeat particularly hard to stomach?

When confronted with the grim reality of what tragedy looks like beyond the parameters of a football pitch, a rugby field, an athletics track, there are no words left to do justice to the emotional pain and desolation felt when hearing the true horrors of sexual abuse.

This week’s conviction of Jim McCafferty, a former kitman for celtic, Hibernian and Falkirk, is a reminder that the current scandal has its tentacles particularly entwined with the Parkhead side because of their historic connections with celtic Boys’ Club, and it won’t disappear any time soon. Nor should it.

First and foremost, what has come shockingly to light about the predatory nature of what was going on in the underbelly of celtic Boys’ Club up until the mid-1990s is odious. To manipulate and exploit the dreams and ambitions of young men in order to satiate perverse sexual gratification is beyond comprehension.

Those words that are the building blocks of our trade seem inadequate to convey the magnitude and depth of how lives were irrevocably destroyed. Alcoholism and deep depression are the recurring threads that run through the stories of the victims, emotional pain that is so entrenched to appear impervious to any balm offered.

But what is equally unfathomable is the glee with which opponents of celtic have relished this latest conviction. The depravity of the acts themselves stand alone but the gloating engendered by these tragedies is in its own way despicable. Child sex abuse as a form of one-upmanship offers a bilious impression of those who wish to point fingers.

And increasingly what is becoming lost in the noise is the voice of the victims.

There are few remnants left of the mess that Fergus McCann inherited when he took over the club in 1994 and prevented celtic from going bankrupt. As a plc, celtic are unrecognisable from top to bottom from those days when the Kellys and the Whites came close to running it into the ground.

But this current scandal is arguably the most visceral issue that the board have had to deal with. It’s incumbent upon the members to recognise that fact.

Legally celtic Boys’ Club had no formal affiliation with celtic Football Club. They were, officially, two different clubs.

But – and it’s a big but – for the children whose lives were left broken and damaged by what they experienced, there was no such differentiation. Their accounts suggest an intricate weaving of the two clubs. The ultimate carrot waved in front of them, and their parents, was that the boys’ club provided a pathway to the celtic first team.

That the boys’ club had regular access to celtic Park, and its pitch rentals were said to have been paid for by celtic, would have strengthened the belief that this was a feeder organisation for the senior side.

An 1986 celtic View editorial was printed by a national newspaper yesterday and cast doubt on the club’s current stance that it was unaware of allegations surrounding some of the boys’ club coaching staff until the mid-90s.

In December, when disgraced former boys’ club coach Jim Torbett was convicted, celtic paused for two days before releasing a statement. It expressed “deep regret” but did not go so far as to offer an apology; to do so would be an admission of liability ahead of potential legal action.

Their statement acknowledged celtic’s history with celtic Boys’ Club but reiterated the stance that there was no formal connection between the two.

It might legally be so, but there is a moral obligation to offer some compensation for those who bought into the dream that pulling on a celtic Boys’ Club shirt would be the gateway to walking out of the celtic tunnel one day.

There are no words adequate to offer any victim of child sexual abuse as consolation. There are no glib soundbites, no slick and clever rhetoric that can compensate for how their lives were affected by what they experienced. An acknowledgement that it has happened and an acknowledgement of their genuine distress is a step in the right direction.

Paedophile Torbett and his accomplice Frank Cairney, both coaches, have been jailed for sexual offences spanning more than 20 years. A third celtic Boys’ Club coach, Gerald King, 66, was convicted of sexual offences against children at a school in Glasgow. Earlier this year he was given a three-year probation order.

Throughout this ordeal – and it has been a life sentence for the victims involved – celtic have kept their distance. There may well be legal absolution over their role.

Moral absolution is not so forthcoming

That could be Spiers writing that , using a nom de plume after he puts on one of his frocks.

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celtic should reach out to victims of Boys Club abuse

May 18 2019, 12:01am,

Graham Spiers

Spiers on Saturday

I am writing this as a father of three little children, two of whom love their sport. One plays football, the other rugby, and every week I see the freedom and joy and character-building that their training and playing gives them. I also see adult volunteers — kind men and women — who give up their time to make it happen. In its own way children and sport is one of life’s cherished rites of passage.

So I cannot imagine the pain in hearing that, through sport, one of my children had been the victim of a paedophile. The sheer agony of it doesn’t bear thinking about. Sport is supposed to be a place of joy, not of degradation and evil.

Gruesome cases of historic child sex abuse are now reported almost on a daily basis and, in Scotland at least, celtic FC finds itself deep in the mire. The jailing of three former celtic Boys Club coaches — Jim Torbett, Frank Cairney and now Jim McCafferty — has placed the club in an excruciating position. There are calls for a public inquiry into the Boys Club scandal, yet celtic have so far remained silent on the issue, no doubt taking their own legal advice.

I remain dumbfounded at the sheer negligence that persisted at celtic in those years between the 1970s through to the 1990s when these scandals were taking place. I recently spoke with Kenny Campbell, one of Torbett’s victims, who told me that it simply became routine for him to be taken back to Torbett’s home in the west end of Glasgow to be abused. Campbell was young, he was impressionable, he was sworn to silence and no doubt scared, all of which allowed the despicable Torbett to carry on with his activities.

Now we have the case of McCafferty, today a shambling and pathetic old man, who pled guilty to 12 counts of abuse involving ten boys in the years between 1972 and 1996. This depraved man was somehow handed jobs with the celtic youth team as well as the Boys Club, and his abuses were said to take place in shower rooms, minibuses and hotels. A physically intimidating man, McCafferty did the same as Torbett: he gained control of a boy’s mind and emotions in order to carry out the abuse.

One of the most pathetic things I have witnessed over this whole particular scandal was McCafferty’s glib and faux-sincere apology for it all, delivered recently to a TV camera, and spoken as if he had been caught stealing some loaves. Last week, for his toll of crimes, McCafferty was sent down for six and half years, a bare minimum I should think.

Other cases involving the celtic Boys Club ended even more tragically. Andrew Gray, another young boy abused by Torbett, came to be suicidal in later life, suffering a series of mental health issues before dying in a swimming pool accident in Australia in 2017. Gray’s sister, Michelle, has spoken movingly and painfully of memories of seeing her brother as a youngster cowering inside their home, with Torbett waiting in his car outside to take him somewhere. “Don’t tell him I’m here!” Andrew would beseech his family, hiding in a room. Michelle and her mother, Helen, are both campaigning vigorously for justice for their brother and son.

The whole celtic Boys Club tragedy throws up unanswered questions. Torbett, monster that he was, was somehow apparently still a friend and business associate of Jack McGinn and Kevin Kelly, two celtic FC directors in those key years between 1986 and 1994, a period when Torbett’s later abuses took place. He had actually already been booted out of celtic under suspicion in 1974 before somehow being allowed to return to the Boys Club in 1978.

Did McGinn and Kelly have no suspicions at all about him? Did they genuinely know nothing of what was going on? If the answer to both these questions is “yes” then only utter negligence and stupidity can explain it. One former celtic player from that time told me: “There was a lot of talk about things going on back then. You heard comments about it. Many people around the club had their suspicions.”

Did Kelly, the former chairman, have no suspicions at all about Torbett?SNS

I think celtic owe it to the victims of the Boys Club scandal. The club holds the view that it was a completely separate entity from the Boys Club, but too much evidence appears to weaken this claim. Whatever the legal hairlines, celtic should reach out to the victims, set up a compensation fund and express unequivocal regret for what happened.

Money can’t change things. The pain and suffering has been inflicted. But apology and contrition might make a small difference to the victims and their families

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46 minutes ago, DMax399 said:

This is not the point, or the real issue at hand.  Why journalists keep banging on about this continues to amaze me.

The issue is that boys were abused and people associated with their club and boys club failed in their duty to report it and end the abuse.

Write about this and the victims and ensure that those who were complicit are punished.  It shouldn't be too much too ask.

correct they are making the peado shouts sound worse than the cover up .

thats what the big jock knew shout is about .the cover up by the parent club .which is a crime itself .if it is indeed a seperate entity. the main club was at the centre of the cover up .

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Just read Spiers comments above. He never mentioned McNeil and the open secret but He is asking questions about suspicions/ cover up.....surely he should at the door of Separate Entity FC  demanding Fuckin answers.

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I think you'll soon see a few journalists (if thats what they are called) will start to turn against their old paymasters, one thing they arent is thick, they know which side to bat for, if they need to switch sides so openly to keep their "jobs" they will 

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1 minute ago, 6superbarry6 said:

The death of the youth player Haggerty for them also seems pretty suspicious now tbh 

It would seem so. Poor lad.

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2 hours ago, SpidermansGaffer said:

Lifted from the gherald. I wonder which team this ‘neutral’ reporter Alison McConnell supports??

Sweep fucking sweep

 

17th May

celtic may be legally absolved of connection to the celtic Boys' Club sex abuse scandal . . . but morally they owe a great deal to victims

THERE are few sportswriters who escape the rush to hyperbole when describing moments of extreme emotion that sport throws up.

Who hasn’t written of the "tragedy" of a particular result? Of the "devastation" of players after a defeat particularly hard to stomach?

When confronted with the grim reality of what tragedy looks like beyond the parameters of a football pitch, a rugby field, an athletics track, there are no words left to do justice to the emotional pain and desolation felt when hearing the true horrors of sexual abuse.

This week’s conviction of Jim McCafferty, a former kitman for celtic, Hibernian and Falkirk, is a reminder that the current scandal has its tentacles particularly entwined with the Parkhead side because of their historic connections with celtic Boys’ Club, and it won’t disappear any time soon. Nor should it.

First and foremost, what has come shockingly to light about the predatory nature of what was going on in the underbelly of celtic Boys’ Club up until the mid-1990s is odious. To manipulate and exploit the dreams and ambitions of young men in order to satiate perverse sexual gratification is beyond comprehension.

Those words that are the building blocks of our trade seem inadequate to convey the magnitude and depth of how lives were irrevocably destroyed. Alcoholism and deep depression are the recurring threads that run through the stories of the victims, emotional pain that is so entrenched to appear impervious to any balm offered.

But what is equally unfathomable is the glee with which opponents of celtic have relished this latest conviction. The depravity of the acts themselves stand alone but the gloating engendered by these tragedies is in its own way despicable. Child sex abuse as a form of one-upmanship offers a bilious impression of those who wish to point fingers.

And increasingly what is becoming lost in the noise is the voice of the victims.

There are few remnants left of the mess that Fergus McCann inherited when he took over the club in 1994 and prevented celtic from going bankrupt. As a plc, celtic are unrecognisable from top to bottom from those days when the Kellys and the Whites came close to running it into the ground.

But this current scandal is arguably the most visceral issue that the board have had to deal with. It’s incumbent upon the members to recognise that fact.

Legally celtic Boys’ Club had no formal affiliation with celtic Football Club. They were, officially, two different clubs.

But – and it’s a big but – for the children whose lives were left broken and damaged by what they experienced, there was no such differentiation. Their accounts suggest an intricate weaving of the two clubs. The ultimate carrot waved in front of them, and their parents, was that the boys’ club provided a pathway to the celtic first team.

That the boys’ club had regular access to celtic Park, and its pitch rentals were said to have been paid for by celtic, would have strengthened the belief that this was a feeder organisation for the senior side.

An 1986 celtic View editorial was printed by a national newspaper yesterday and cast doubt on the club’s current stance that it was unaware of allegations surrounding some of the boys’ club coaching staff until the mid-90s.

In December, when disgraced former boys’ club coach Jim Torbett was convicted, celtic paused for two days before releasing a statement. It expressed “deep regret” but did not go so far as to offer an apology; to do so would be an admission of liability ahead of potential legal action.

Their statement acknowledged celtic’s history with celtic Boys’ Club but reiterated the stance that there was no formal connection between the two.

It might legally be so, but there is a moral obligation to offer some compensation for those who bought into the dream that pulling on a celtic Boys’ Club shirt would be the gateway to walking out of the celtic tunnel one day.

There are no words adequate to offer any victim of child sexual abuse as consolation. There are no glib soundbites, no slick and clever rhetoric that can compensate for how their lives were affected by what they experienced. An acknowledgement that it has happened and an acknowledgement of their genuine distress is a step in the right direction.

Paedophile Torbett and his accomplice Frank Cairney, both coaches, have been jailed for sexual offences spanning more than 20 years. A third celtic Boys’ Club coach, Gerald King, 66, was convicted of sexual offences against children at a school in Glasgow. Earlier this year he was given a three-year probation order.

Throughout this ordeal – and it has been a life sentence for the victims involved – celtic have kept their distance. There may well be legal absolution over their role.

Moral absolution is not so forthcoming

No surprise there then, just found her Twitter account. Rabid tim would be an understatement...

AF31C65A-1E60-4943-8EED-9F556491788D.jpeg

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2 hours ago, SpidermansGaffer said:

Lifted from the gherald. I wonder which team this ‘neutral’ reporter Alison McConnell supports??

Sweep fucking sweep

 

17th May

celtic may be legally absolved of connection to the celtic Boys' Club sex abuse scandal . . . but morally they owe a great deal to victims

THERE are few sportswriters who escape the rush to hyperbole when describing moments of extreme emotion that sport throws up.

Who hasn’t written of the "tragedy" of a particular result? Of the "devastation" of players after a defeat particularly hard to stomach?

When confronted with the grim reality of what tragedy looks like beyond the parameters of a football pitch, a rugby field, an athletics track, there are no words left to do justice to the emotional pain and desolation felt when hearing the true horrors of sexual abuse.

This week’s conviction of Jim McCafferty, a former kitman for celtic, Hibernian and Falkirk, is a reminder that the current scandal has its tentacles particularly entwined with the Parkhead side because of their historic connections with celtic Boys’ Club, and it won’t disappear any time soon. Nor should it.

First and foremost, what has come shockingly to light about the predatory nature of what was going on in the underbelly of celtic Boys’ Club up until the mid-1990s is odious. To manipulate and exploit the dreams and ambitions of young men in order to satiate perverse sexual gratification is beyond comprehension.

Those words that are the building blocks of our trade seem inadequate to convey the magnitude and depth of how lives were irrevocably destroyed. Alcoholism and deep depression are the recurring threads that run through the stories of the victims, emotional pain that is so entrenched to appear impervious to any balm offered.

But what is equally unfathomable is the glee with which opponents of celtic have relished this latest conviction. The depravity of the acts themselves stand alone but the gloating engendered by these tragedies is in its own way despicable. Child sex abuse as a form of one-upmanship offers a bilious impression of those who wish to point fingers.

And increasingly what is becoming lost in the noise is the voice of the victims.

There are few remnants left of the mess that Fergus McCann inherited when he took over the club in 1994 and prevented celtic from going bankrupt. As a plc, celtic are unrecognisable from top to bottom from those days when the Kellys and the Whites came close to running it into the ground.

But this current scandal is arguably the most visceral issue that the board have had to deal with. It’s incumbent upon the members to recognise that fact.

Legally celtic Boys’ Club had no formal affiliation with celtic Football Club. They were, officially, two different clubs.

But – and it’s a big but – for the children whose lives were left broken and damaged by what they experienced, there was no such differentiation. Their accounts suggest an intricate weaving of the two clubs. The ultimate carrot waved in front of them, and their parents, was that the boys’ club provided a pathway to the celtic first team.

That the boys’ club had regular access to celtic Park, and its pitch rentals were said to have been paid for by celtic, would have strengthened the belief that this was a feeder organisation for the senior side.

An 1986 celtic View editorial was printed by a national newspaper yesterday and cast doubt on the club’s current stance that it was unaware of allegations surrounding some of the boys’ club coaching staff until the mid-90s.

In December, when disgraced former boys’ club coach Jim Torbett was convicted, celtic paused for two days before releasing a statement. It expressed “deep regret” but did not go so far as to offer an apology; to do so would be an admission of liability ahead of potential legal action.

Their statement acknowledged celtic’s history with celtic Boys’ Club but reiterated the stance that there was no formal connection between the two.

It might legally be so, but there is a moral obligation to offer some compensation for those who bought into the dream that pulling on a celtic Boys’ Club shirt would be the gateway to walking out of the celtic tunnel one day.

There are no words adequate to offer any victim of child sexual abuse as consolation. There are no glib soundbites, no slick and clever rhetoric that can compensate for how their lives were affected by what they experienced. An acknowledgement that it has happened and an acknowledgement of their genuine distress is a step in the right direction.

Paedophile Torbett and his accomplice Frank Cairney, both coaches, have been jailed for sexual offences spanning more than 20 years. A third celtic Boys’ Club coach, Gerald King, 66, was convicted of sexual offences against children at a school in Glasgow. Earlier this year he was given a three-year probation order.

Throughout this ordeal – and it has been a life sentence for the victims involved – celtic have kept their distance. There may well be legal absolution over their role.

Moral absolution is not so forthcoming

I expected this tbh

Get some rhancid bheast loving woman to do pieces like this 

It takes the heat off 

She used to be one of many of them on snyde. Or is she still there

Vermin. This lot

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17 minutes ago, Jimbeamjunior said:

I think you'll soon see a few journalists (if thats what they are called) will start to turn against their old paymasters, one thing they arent is thick, they know which side to bat for, if they need to switch sides so openly to keep their "jobs" they will 

I dont see that Jim at all 

Once a bheast. Always a bheast 

They will continue to cover tracks. Make excuses. Point the finger. Whatever it takes to wiggle our or contain rhe damage 

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2 hours ago, hawkeye said:

That could be Spiers writing that , using a nom de plume after he puts on one of his frocks.

Written too well to come from Spiers, lying taig cunt in the original column though.

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9 minutes ago, Blue Nosed Babe said:

The Courts will rule on the status of the relationship between the two and not a tin pot celtic supporting so called journalist.

Patrick McGuire says the separate entity claim is nonsense and I am more inclined to believe him.

Im sure they are a seperate entity in a legal sense  but not completely unassociated .just like other parts of the holding company could be deemed seperate entities like the retail and football club will be .

they boys club will have been set up seperate .but there is not a single hope in hell when it was founded that there was not some tie up involved .use of strip .badge .training facilities .money going from parent club to boys club for funding .etc etc.

The moral obligation cant ever be removed .The figure suggested of 5m is chicken feed for the holding company .The price of a 3m player on a 4 year contract .puts perspective on what the cost would be .

One thing the parent club can never get away from is the fact they knew of the abuse and covered it up and knew for many years and even had enough control of the seperate entity to remove Torbett and still enough to invite him back .

 

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3 hours ago, SpidermansGaffer said:

Lifted from the gherald. I wonder which team this ‘neutral’ reporter Alison McConnell supports??

Sweep fucking sweep

 

17th May

celtic may be legally absolved of connection to the celtic Boys' Club sex abuse scandal . . . but morally they owe a great deal to victims

But what is equally unfathomable is the glee with which opponents of celtic have relished this latest conviction. The depravity of the acts themselves stand alone but the gloating engendered by these tragedies is in its own way despicable.

Legally celtic Boys’ Club had no formal affiliation with celtic Football Club. They were, officially, two different clubs.

Sweep, sweep - the worst ones are the one trying to highlight it was a club full of paedos - sweep, sweep. 

 

Plus, in the same argument, I’ve yet to see or read proof that they were in fact, legally and officially, two different clubs. The only ‘proof’ of this is the word of those at Paedo FC and excuse me taking that with a pinch of abused salt. 

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3 hours ago, heathen fish boy said:

Change it to the Davie Cooper centre I say

That area of Hamilton is absolutely full of taigs . Not much chance of that happening

They would have no affinity to a guy who's mother lives no more than 2 minutes walk away from the building

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15 minutes ago, 5Beckenbauer said:

Sweep, sweep - the worst ones are the one trying to highlight it was a club full of paedos - sweep, sweep. 

 

Plus, in the same argument, I’ve yet to see or read proof that they were in fact, legally and officially, two different clubs. The only ‘proof’ of this is the word of those at Paedo FC and excuse me taking that with a pinch of abused salt. 

I think they will be forced to pay up to the victims  but this one excuse will get them off with further punishments.

The payments will be made and all the pro  bheasts  media hacks will have the glowing tributes of charitable kindness lined up

 

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19 minutes ago, magic8ball said:

Im sure they are a seperate entity in a legal sense  but not completely unassociated .just like other parts of the holding company could be deemed seperate entities like the retail and football club will be .

they boys club will have been set up seperate .but there is not a single hope in hell when it was founded that there was not some tie up involved .use of strip .badge .training facilities .money going from parent club to boys club for funding .etc etc.

The moral obligation cant ever be removed .The figure suggested of 5m is chicken feed for the holding company .The price of a 3m player on a 4 year contract .puts perspective on what the cost would be .

One thing the parent club can never get away from is the fact they knew of the abuse and covered it up and knew for many years and even had enough control of the seperate entity to remove Torbett and still enough to invite him back .

 

And everyone seems to be forgetting . The many links to a clear puedo ring here . In the desperation to absolve bheast fc

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