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Johnny Dangerously

Rangers related picture thread

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2 minutes ago, Band of Brothers said:

Family or yours 40yr ago :mutley:

No bud , though I do have a simple  Glasgow Rangers on my upper arm 👍

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Just now, Johnny Dangerously said:

No bud , though I do have a simple  Glasgow Rangers on my upper arm 👍

Get it posted big yin :UK:

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1 minute ago, Johnny Dangerously said:

No bud , though I do have a simple  Glasgow Rangers on my upper arm 👍

When did goalies start wearing gloves so many pics with no gloves amazing to think they have developed into frog hands now.

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Just now, Band of Brothers said:

When did goalies start wearing gloves so many pics with no gloves amazing to think they have developed into frog hands now.

Good question

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Just now, Johnny Dangerously said:

Good question

When i was growing up it was dimple gloves but was it a choice back in the day to wear even wooly gloves to take sting out or were they not aloud?

Bit like shin pads as well mind Mo J never woe any as his socks were always at his ankles maybe he never liked the red bit though :lol:

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Yeah Mo, the wee rat Provan at Sellik and there was a guy at QPR I remember from 70s , none of them wore shin guards. Never liked them myself when I was a star player in my youth 😀

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1 hour ago, G.E.C. said:

Scored in most of the games during the run in, crucial ones as well. 

He scored in four of them of which 2 were only won by a 1 goal margin, so you have a valid point. 

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41 minutes ago, Band of Brothers said:

When did goalies start wearing gloves so many pics with no gloves amazing to think they have developed into frog hands now.

Argentina's Amadeo Carrizo was the first goalkeeper known to have worn gloves. Carrizo played for Argentine club side River Plate in the 1940s and 1950s.

The use of goalie gloves became more common in the late 1960s and early 1970s, but many goalkeepers still only wore them in wet conditions. Furthermore, the lack of specialized goalie glove manufacturers meant that some of the era’s best goalies were still playing in gardening gloves. Gordon Banks, the legendary English national team goalkeeper, only started using goalie gloves as an experiment in the 1970 Mexico World Cup, says the British Glove Association website.

The 1970s marked a turning point in goalie glove history. As gloves became more popular, the demand for specialized goalkeeping gloves increased. Manufacturers such as Stanno, Reusch, Uhlsport and Sondico suddenly found their gloves to be in demand, both from amateur and professional goalkeepers alike. The gloves were basic but offered greater protection and grip to the wearer, the two key principles of modern goalie glove design.

By the 1980s, goalie gloves had become a fundamental piece of soccer equipment. Manufacturers began to put more research into their designs, particularly in terms of grip. They experimented with terry cloth, the coating of table tennis paddles and latex foam. Latex foam goalie gloves soon became standard.

Goalie glove technology has advanced dramatically since the 1980s. Latex foam treatments have allowed for stickier and more durable gloves, while various moldings have added a completely new vocabulary to the industry. Goalkeepers can now choose between flat-palmed gloves, heavily padded roll finger gloves and snug-fitting negative cut gloves. As with soccer shoe design, innovations within the goalie glove manufacturing industry have resulted in a wide range of different models and styles. Choosing goalie gloves, therefore, has become a lot more complicated than buying a nice pair of gardening gloves.

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8 minutes ago, Don54 said:

Argentina's Amadeo Carrizo was the first goalkeeper known to have worn gloves. Carrizo played for Argentine club side River Plate in the 1940s and 1950s.

The use of goalie gloves became more common in the late 1960s and early 1970s, but many goalkeepers still only wore them in wet conditions. Furthermore, the lack of specialized goalie glove manufacturers meant that some of the era’s best goalies were still playing in gardening gloves. Gordon Banks, the legendary English national team goalkeeper, only started using goalie gloves as an experiment in the 1970 Mexico World Cup, says the British Glove Association website.

The 1970s marked a turning point in goalie glove history. As gloves became more popular, the demand for specialized goalkeeping gloves increased. Manufacturers such as Stanno, Reusch, Uhlsport and Sondico suddenly found their gloves to be in demand, both from amateur and professional goalkeepers alike. The gloves were basic but offered greater protection and grip to the wearer, the two key principles of modern goalie glove design.

By the 1980s, goalie gloves had become a fundamental piece of soccer equipment. Manufacturers began to put more research into their designs, particularly in terms of grip. They experimented with terry cloth, the coating of table tennis paddles and latex foam. Latex foam goalie gloves soon became standard.

Goalie glove technology has advanced dramatically since the 1980s. Latex foam treatments have allowed for stickier and more durable gloves, while various moldings have added a completely new vocabulary to the industry. Goalkeepers can now choose between flat-palmed gloves, heavily padded roll finger gloves and snug-fitting negative cut gloves. As with soccer shoe design, innovations within the goalie glove manufacturing industry have resulted in a wide range of different models and styles. Choosing goalie gloves, therefore, has become a lot more complicated than buying a nice pair of gardening gloves.

A lot of young lads now wont even remember goalies with no gloves I just remember the dimple ones but that is a great insight cheers :tu:

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