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D'Artagnan

What is that strange red hand ?

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“Well the Germans in their trenches they could scarce believe their eyes

When up and charged those Ulster men and they heard their battle cry

For what kind of men are these they said who would leave their native land

For to die upon a battle field and what is that strange red handâ€

This verse is taken from the song “Englishman’s Betrayal†which depicts the outstanding bravery of the 36th Ulster Division on the first day of the Battle of the Somme. The Ulstermen were the only Division in the British Army to achieve their objectives that day, but at heavy cost.

Small wonder then that the Germans gazed in awe at these courageous fighters and asked “what is that strange red handâ€

The symbol of the Red Hand has long been associated with Ulster, and clans actually argued over ownership. The origins of the symbol are still unclear.

Cast an eye around our support, and the symbol of the red hand is extremely common, and so it should be, considering that outside Glasgow Belfast is the biggest Rangers supporting city in Britain. And of course the flying of the Red Hand has drawn criticism of our support, so much so that at times our club has acquiesced to such criticism, with red hand flags being airbrushed out of pictures in Rangers publications.

Despite no longer carrying official status since the abolition of the Northern Ireland Govt in 1973, it remains a potent symbol of Ulster to all who gaze upon it.

Unlike those who frown upon at it’s unfurling amongst our support, I rejoice when I see it flying. It is a potent symbol of victory over tyranny, of the ballot box over the bomb, and of the resilience and bravery of a people to refuse to submit to terror, threats and intimidation.

It symbolism and significance are far too important to be reduced to being a mechanism to wind up our rivals, or allow others to suggest it is merely an extension of sectarianism. And let no one fool you otherwise, particularly our clubs detractors.

To see the red hand flag flying at Ibrox is a victory for freedom, and whether you be Scot, Ulster Scot or Ulsterman we should remember the trials, tribulations and suffering which many have endured to ensure its preservation.

There are many who would lambast the Ulsterman for the stubbornness of his ways, his refusal to compromise, his inward resolve. You will find that most of these critics were not at the Battle of the Somme, nor have they faced a life under threat or intimidation of the terrorist. I doubt any have been prepared to lay down their lives for the cause of freedom.

Let us never apologise for symbols which epitomise all that is good about our people.

“So feel the winds of change through the land

Feel the spirit of the red hand

And in this cold dark night

Keep it shining bright

Carry it like a flame in your heartâ€

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Morning D'Art, good to hear from you again.

Cracking post, a most eloquent No Surrender.

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Great stuff D'art. My Great Grandfather Troughton died at the Somme, 3 days before the big push. His mother was a Frazer so he was of Ulster Scot's stock as many were...

I for one love to see the Red Hand of Ulster flying high...

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Good to see you back on the site D'Art. Hope all is well with you. (tu)

With such a huge following from NI, any symbols that we can fly to celebrate them and Rangers in Unison has to be flown with pride.

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Guest Andypendek

i can't see why anyone could be offended by the flag, excepting celtic types and hyper-sensitive ex-policemen with nothing better to do. don't agree with the hand salute thing, that's too easy to be misinterpreted. you see flags of all countries at grounds all over the UK every saturday, it would be most unfair, not to say hypocritical, to ban one flag on the grounds it might be offensive to someone who happened past.

i didnj't know rangers wre in unison. good to see murray taking an interest in the union movement at last.

and a warm hello to my dear chum.

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Does it not matter to you that one flag is associated with terrorist atrocities and allowing the nazi's a free hand in Europe, and the other is not? We really shouldn't allow ourselves to be taken down this road of equivalence because the Ulster Flag is proudly British and that diseased tricolour is not

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Great post D'art.

My grandfather took part in the Battle of the Somme. He was a Sgt Major in the Cameron Highlanders. Came from the Loch Broom area near Ullapool in wester ross-shire. He was seriously wounded and had both bayonet and bullet wounds. Funnily enough in a break in the battle when both sides stretcher bearers were out a German patrol signalled to the British that there was a wounded soldier in need of help. He had laid a day and a half in the mud. He survived and lived until he was 86. A real tough wee bugger he was too. He took me to see the Rangers when I was 7 - 53 years ago.

Yes, all these men were special and like all who fought deserve to be remembered. Not treated like dirt.

Great post.

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I very inspirational post D'art. Ulstermen have been an integral part of our Island nations' armed forces and their symbols deserved to be displayed with pride. Glad to see you back, I have missed your words of wisdom.

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As Cpt. W.B. Spender ,an English officer, said at the Somme----------------------------

I AM NOT AN ULSTERMEN,BUT YESTERDAY AS I WATCHED THEIR BRAVE CHARGE AT THE SOMME, I FELT THERE WAS NOTHING IN THIS WORLD BETTER TO BE THAN AN ULSTERMAN.

and some things never change.

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Fantastic post D'Art.

Welcome back to the boards, I hope all is well.

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Great post D'Art and good to see you back.

I love that song.

So on and on they charged that day where others feared to tread

And in the mud and on the wire,they left behind their dead

Now the only flag to fly that day behind the German lines

Was the old Red Hand of Ulster with its Shamrocks bound in nine

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WB D'Art, good to see you around again.

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Great post, D. Good to see you back on the forum again, I hope all is well.

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Anyone educated enough on the subject and mystery surrounding the Red Hand Of Ulster will also be able to inform those who may be unaware that the Red Hand is actually one of the few cross community symbols that exist in Ireland both north and south.

It is widely used by the Gaelic football institutions and many teams sport it upon their shirts. It is used as we all know in the Red Hand Of Ulster Flag which was until 1973 as mentioned the official flag of the government of N.ireland. Although technically this would now be viewed as unofficial it is still widely used and accepted including by bodies such as FIFA as the national flag of N.ireland.

Their is much misinformation in the media surrounding people being offended by it which is just untrue due to the FACTS as mentioned that the Red Hand is a commonly shared emblem between both Protestants and Catholics.

Inspiring post as usual, made even better because its Monday and inspiration is otherwise in short supply.

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“Well the Germans in their trenches they could scarce believe their eyes

When up and charged those Ulster men and they heard their battle cry

For what kind of men are these they said who would leave their native land

For to die upon a battle field and what is that strange red handâ€

This verse is taken from the song “Englishman’s Betrayal†which depicts the outstanding bravery of the 36th Ulster Division on the first day of the Battle of the Somme. The Ulstermen were the only Division in the British Army to achieve their objectives that day, but at heavy cost.

Small wonder then that the Germans gazed in awe at these courageous fighters and asked “what is that strange red handâ€

The symbol of the Red Hand has long been associated with Ulster, and clans actually argued over ownership. The origins of the symbol are still unclear.

Cast an eye around our support, and the symbol of the red hand is extremely common, and so it should be, considering that outside Glasgow Belfast is the biggest Rangers supporting city in Britain. And of course the flying of the Red Hand has drawn criticism of our support, so much so that at times our club has acquiesced to such criticism, with red hand flags being airbrushed out of pictures in Rangers publications.

Despite no longer carrying official status since the abolition of the Northern Ireland Govt in 1973, it remains a potent symbol of Ulster to all who gaze upon it.

Unlike those who frown upon at it’s unfurling amongst our support, I rejoice when I see it flying. It is a potent symbol of victory over tyranny, of the ballot box over the bomb, and of the resilience and bravery of a people to refuse to submit to terror, threats and intimidation.

It symbolism and significance are far too important to be reduced to being a mechanism to wind up our rivals, or allow others to suggest it is merely an extension of sectarianism. And let no one fool you otherwise, particularly our clubs detractors.

To see the red hand flag flying at Ibrox is a victory for freedom, and whether you be Scot, Ulster Scot or Ulsterman we should remember the trials, tribulations and suffering which many have endured to ensure its preservation.

There are many who would lambast the Ulsterman for the stubbornness of his ways, his refusal to compromise, his inward resolve. You will find that most of these critics were not at the Battle of the Somme, nor have they faced a life under threat or intimidation of the terrorist. I doubt any have been prepared to lay down their lives for the cause of freedom.

Let us never apologise for symbols which epitomise all that is good about our people.

“So feel the winds of change through the land

Feel the spirit of the red hand

And in this cold dark night

Keep it shining bright

Carry it like a flame in your heartâ€

Whoopee - and what the hell has this got to do with Football and Rangers (apart from the fact that some still try to tie the club in to all that protestant baggage we carry and some wave it at Rangers games)

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“Well the Germans in their trenches they could scarce believe their eyes

When up and charged those Ulster men and they heard their battle cry

For what kind of men are these they said who would leave their native land

For to die upon a battle field and what is that strange red handâ€

This verse is taken from the song “Englishman’s Betrayal†which depicts the outstanding bravery of the 36th Ulster Division on the first day of the Battle of the Somme. The Ulstermen were the only Division in the British Army to achieve their objectives that day, but at heavy cost.

Small wonder then that the Germans gazed in awe at these courageous fighters and asked “what is that strange red handâ€

The symbol of the Red Hand has long been associated with Ulster, and clans actually argued over ownership. The origins of the symbol are still unclear.

Cast an eye around our support, and the symbol of the red hand is extremely common, and so it should be, considering that outside Glasgow Belfast is the biggest Rangers supporting city in Britain. And of course the flying of the Red Hand has drawn criticism of our support, so much so that at times our club has acquiesced to such criticism, with red hand flags being airbrushed out of pictures in Rangers publications.

Despite no longer carrying official status since the abolition of the Northern Ireland Govt in 1973, it remains a potent symbol of Ulster to all who gaze upon it.

Unlike those who frown upon at it’s unfurling amongst our support, I rejoice when I see it flying. It is a potent symbol of victory over tyranny, of the ballot box over the bomb, and of the resilience and bravery of a people to refuse to submit to terror, threats and intimidation.

It symbolism and significance are far too important to be reduced to being a mechanism to wind up our rivals, or allow others to suggest it is merely an extension of sectarianism. And let no one fool you otherwise, particularly our clubs detractors.

To see the red hand flag flying at Ibrox is a victory for freedom, and whether you be Scot, Ulster Scot or Ulsterman we should remember the trials, tribulations and suffering which many have endured to ensure its preservation.

There are many who would lambast the Ulsterman for the stubbornness of his ways, his refusal to compromise, his inward resolve. You will find that most of these critics were not at the Battle of the Somme, nor have they faced a life under threat or intimidation of the terrorist. I doubt any have been prepared to lay down their lives for the cause of freedom.

Let us never apologise for symbols which epitomise all that is good about our people.

“So feel the winds of change through the land

Feel the spirit of the red hand

And in this cold dark night

Keep it shining bright

Carry it like a flame in your heartâ€

Whoopee - and what the hell has this got to do with Football and Rangers (apart from the fact that some still try to tie the club in to all that protestant baggage we carry and some wave it at Rangers games)

Feel free to leave this thread.

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Stayed in the Swallow on Paisley Rd saturday it was full of boys and men from Ireland most were proudly wearing shirts with the red hand badges and their Rangers scarfs. :rangers: How people can frown on this beyond me.

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“Well the Germans in their trenches they could scarce believe their eyes

When up and charged those Ulster men and they heard their battle cry

For what kind of men are these they said who would leave their native land

For to die upon a battle field and what is that strange red handâ€

This verse is taken from the song “Englishman’s Betrayal†which depicts the outstanding bravery of the 36th Ulster Division on the first day of the Battle of the Somme. The Ulstermen were the only Division in the British Army to achieve their objectives that day, but at heavy cost.

Small wonder then that the Germans gazed in awe at these courageous fighters and asked “what is that strange red handâ€

The symbol of the Red Hand has long been associated with Ulster, and clans actually argued over ownership. The origins of the symbol are still unclear.

Cast an eye around our support, and the symbol of the red hand is extremely common, and so it should be, considering that outside Glasgow Belfast is the biggest Rangers supporting city in Britain. And of course the flying of the Red Hand has drawn criticism of our support, so much so that at times our club has acquiesced to such criticism, with red hand flags being airbrushed out of pictures in Rangers publications.

Despite no longer carrying official status since the abolition of the Northern Ireland Govt in 1973, it remains a potent symbol of Ulster to all who gaze upon it.

Unlike those who frown upon at it’s unfurling amongst our support, I rejoice when I see it flying. It is a potent symbol of victory over tyranny, of the ballot box over the bomb, and of the resilience and bravery of a people to refuse to submit to terror, threats and intimidation.

It symbolism and significance are far too important to be reduced to being a mechanism to wind up our rivals, or allow others to suggest it is merely an extension of sectarianism. And let no one fool you otherwise, particularly our clubs detractors.

To see the red hand flag flying at Ibrox is a victory for freedom, and whether you be Scot, Ulster Scot or Ulsterman we should remember the trials, tribulations and suffering which many have endured to ensure its preservation.

There are many who would lambast the Ulsterman for the stubbornness of his ways, his refusal to compromise, his inward resolve. You will find that most of these critics were not at the Battle of the Somme, nor have they faced a life under threat or intimidation of the terrorist. I doubt any have been prepared to lay down their lives for the cause of freedom.

Let us never apologise for symbols which epitomise all that is good about our people.

“So feel the winds of change through the land

Feel the spirit of the red hand

And in this cold dark night

Keep it shining bright

Carry it like a flame in your heartâ€

Whoopee - and what the hell has this got to do with Football and Rangers (apart from the fact that some still try to tie the club in to all that protestant baggage we carry and some wave it at Rangers games)

Here we go... there's always one.

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“Well the Germans in their trenches they could scarce believe their eyes

When up and charged those Ulster men and they heard their battle cry

Carry it like a flame in your heartâ€

Whoopee - and what the hell has this got to do with Football and Rangers (apart from the fact that some still try to tie the club in to all that protestant baggage we carry and some wave it at Rangers games)

Here we go... there's always one.

Reasonable question - no answer (yet) - What has it got to do with football? - IMO - NOTHING.

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Whoopee - and what the hell has this got to do with Football and Rangers (apart from the fact that some still try to tie the club in to all that protestant baggage we carry and some wave it at Rangers games)

Hi David.

You and the greedy one may find our heritage an inconvenience, but the vast majority of our support are proud of that past.

If UlsterScots want to fly the red hand of Ulster at the games then they are free to do so.

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