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  1. I read we were looking at 2 players there but it could just be Juan.
    57 likes
  2. We’ve got to bury them this summer. Qualifying for the CL is pretty much essential, but we’ve got to make sure we sell smart and don’t weaken ourselves. Don’t give them any hope, the league next season is weirdly almost as important as 55, because it guarantees £30million in revenue due to CL spot
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  3. Can’t believe they’re letting brown go just as he’s back to his world class best at weekend.
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  4. MARCUS TAVERNIER believes his title-winning brother James has found a home at Rangers. Tavernier has endured a rollercoaster six years in Glasgow since Mark Warburton signed him from Wigan in 2015. Rangers captain James Tavernier is in his sixth season at Ibrox Often a whipping boy for Ibrox fans, the 29-year-old has been forced to watch Celtic enjoy unprecedented supremacy in Scotland. Now though, the right-back has written himself into Ibrox folklore after leading Gers to arguably the most important title win in their history. Tavernier - tipped to hoover up this season's Player of the Year gongs - is entering the final year of his Rangers contract and talks are expected to open soon over an extension. And Marcus, 22, believes it would take something special to tempt his big bro to leave Govan. Brother Marcus Tavernier plays for Middlesbrough He told the Athletic: "I don’t think we realised how big the club was. “He’s found himself a home now. Before Rangers, he didn’t have that. “What’s not to like about playing for Rangers? He’s captain, he’s just won the league and he’s about to play Champions League football. "Every player can only wish to do that, so for him to leave at some point would be the hardest decision he’s made.” The Tavernier family is now steeped in Rangers - especially mum Bernie. Marcus said: “She is Rangers’ No 1 fan at the moment, she loves the club. “She won’t have anything green in the house and won’t say any words to do with Celtic or any of their players’ names! "She’s really taken it to heart about how much it means to my brother and the family.” Middlesbrough wideman Marcus hasn't met his sibling in over a year now due to the coronavirus pandemic. However, the pair speak every day and Marcus remembers a particular video call as Celtic fell to a shock loss in Dingwall in February. He said: “I called him on Facetime him when Celtic were playing Ross County and it was like he was playing against them in the last five minutes. He was basically managing County, telling them to clear it. “The journey he has gone on has been incredible. For him to be captain when they stopped 10 in a row and got that trophy back, I couldn’t be happier for him. “People don’t realise how much Rangers means to him. He’s fallen in love with the club.”
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  5. Fuck me man it's as if Rangers fans are suddenly the only people in the country who go outside, getting to the point where Wuhan will get a reprieve shortly and the virus will actually have originated from inside Ibrox.
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  6. A HAHAHA HAHAHA YgFq-3lf19jtPsz2.mp4
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  7. PM @born a blue nose m8, I've bought loads of him, would recommend.
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  8. Alfrtdo Morelos.mp4
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  9. The scum are going to have some turnaround of squad this year, I genuinely believe it will take at least 2/3 years to fix, the pandemic makes it harder. It's crucial for us to gain access to CL over the next two years, really could put us well ahead of them. Edouard, Duffy, Kenny, Brown, Laxalt and Elyounoussi all look like leaving. Ajer, Griffiths and Christie in their final year could also be sold. Doubts over Rogic staying. Bolingoli and Ntcham be back from their loans. Jullien a long term injury. Squad could actually be something like this before signings - Barkas, Bain, Hazard, Welsh, Taylor, Jullien, Ralston, Bitton, Soro, Turnbull, Johnstone, McGregor, Forrest, Ajeti, Klimala, Ntcham and Bolingoli.
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  10. Canae blame us he died last year.
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  11. Even if Desmond throws money at it, which I don't think he will. They are in for a long rebuild. These days and with the money throwing about in the market. It's not possible even with a bigger budget to build a new team in one window. I've said before when that realisation hits the scum fans they'll start walking away. If we continue getting our recruitment right we can pull further ahead from them.
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  12. If they really believe it's a stone waller then they'll appeal the booking. Still waiting on that.
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  13. Love this ❤🤍💙 the old coloured seats 🤩
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  14. "Awright lads, pass the ball ra sellick way yeah. Look a bit harder. Stare intae the distance and look mystical."
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  15. Used to be when some cunt rattled you you’d try not to show they’d hurt you.
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  16. They're really going for the title of most dishonorable shower of cunts in Europe. Definitely bricking it though, they've went from saying that absolutely nothing racist was said to saying they'll take action if the investigation warrants it Why would they need to take action if the cunt said "you fucking guy"? They're totally contradicting themselves. I can see them throwing the racist prick.under the bus, and while he deserves the blame I certainly want to see Slavia as a club punished in some way just for how they've acted during the aftermath of this Scum club, scum owners, and scum fans. Fuck Slavia
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  17. I was too numb to cry when he passed. For days I just kept thinking"Why?". It just hit me so hard I couldn't really take it in properly. I've she'd a year every year since though. It's hard to explain to people how much a hero means to you, but essentially, all through my teens, I wanted to actually be Davie Cooper. I spent hours in our street with a ball trying to do the things he did. Tried to run the way he ran. As I say...hard to explain properly. Thank you for not only being one of the greatest ever Rangers, Davie....but for giving me someone to look up to and give me something to aim for. I never even came close to being anything like you, but you inspired me to at least try. You were...ARE, my one and only real hero! I'll forever have that image of Super Ally holding you up after you scored that penalty against Celtic in the 86 cup final, thousands of bears in the background going mad! That's my ever lasting memory of you...... making us happy every time you played. Rest in peace Coop!
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  18. https://www.theguardian.com/football/2021/mar/23/furore-around-glen-kamara-shows-how-racists-can-keep-getting-away-with-abuse?CMP=Share_AndroidApp_Other Furore around Glen Kamara shows how racists can keep getting away with abuse Jonathan Liew31 Jan 2021 To get their personal violations recognised, victims of racism have to navigate an obstacle course of suspicion and bad faith You’re a footballer who has been racially abused by an opponent in the course of doing your job. So let’s talk tactics, scenarios, next steps. Yes, I know it happened only a few seconds ago. You’re angry, upset, confused. Above all there’s a football match still to be won, and you don’t want to lose your focus. But really, you need to get your head in the game. Because even in these raw early moments, one false move, one wrong choice, and your prospects of justice are sunk. Obviously you’ll want to lodge a formal complaint as soon as possible. But of course the referee didn’t hear anything, and the opponent has an angelic “Who, me?” expression on his face. Here’s your first task: you need to remember the exact words that were used. Was it “fucking monkey”, “black monkey” or just “monkey”? Yes, it’s gruesome, but it’s important. Get it wrong, admit the merest uncertainty, alter your story one iota, and in a few months’ time a smooth-talking lawyer will be flaying you to ribbons in front of an FA disciplinary panel. Next: make sure you flag the incident up at the time and gather witnesses, or you’ll be accused of making it up afterwards. And remember, you need to look just the right amount of angry: too angry and people will assume you’re motivated by rage, not angry enough and people will assume you’re a scheming, mendacious troublemaker. Once this gets out, you’ll need as thick a skin as you can muster. You’ll be forced to relive those few traumatic seconds again and again, through ever more jaundiced filters. Your reputation and your motives will be dragged through the mud. You will be abused again, this time in great anonymous torrents. And for all the support and encouragement you will also receive, the whole affair will leave an unpleasant aftertaste: a problem everyone wishes would simply go away. By the time of the hearing, the incident will begin to feel like a surreal abstraction: you, who were there, will have your recollections challenged by others who weren’t. The player who abused you will wheel out a succession of character witnesses to defend their honour. If he had said the thing, they will insist, that would make him a racist. But he isn’t a racist, and so he can’t have said it. Ultimately, you will be told, it’s your word against his, and so nothing more can be done. The reason for sketching this process out in such gristly, unpleasant detail is that there remains a significant body of opinion that is convinced people put themselves through all this for a laugh. This cropped up again recently, after the Rangers midfielder Glen Kamara accused Slavia Prague’s Ondrej Kudela of racially abusing him during their Europa League game on Thursday. Kudela has denied the accusation and Uefa will hear the case in due course. And yet already Kamara’s treatment is a reminder of the obstacle course that awaits all victims of racist abuse: gaslighting, obfuscation, counter-narrative, a system that seems to be rigged from top to bottom against the accuser in favour of the accused. I discovered this on a much smaller scale only a few years ago. Towards the end of the last Ashes tour, an English journalist racially abused me in the press box of the Sydney Cricket Ground. Or, more specifically, in a corridor near the press box: a detail I now realise was hardly accidental. As the older journalist flatly denied making the remark he had made about eight seconds earlier, there was a devilish glint in his eye: the stomach-turning realisation that I would never be able to prove otherwise. And in the end, he got away with it. Complaints were lodged. Grave, stony-faced summits were held. My version of events was scrutinised with a forensic laser focus. Did I have a grudge? Did I provoke him? Could I have heard something else? All he had to do, meanwhile, was deny everything. And – legally speaking – that was that. Game over. Multiply this by hundreds, thousands, and you realise why so many acts of personal violation – racism, harassment, sexual abuse – go unpunished. Kamara has received plenty of support, but also a good deal of scepticism and outright hostility from rival fans. Like many before him, he has been accused of simply inventing the whole episode. And remember, this was an on-field incident captured live on television. Imagine the overwhelming burden of proof required to substantiate a similar accusation in amateur football. In a dressing room. In a boardroom. We know racist abuse is a common, widespread problem. Conversely, there is no body of evidence to suggest that false or malicious accusations of racism exist on remotely the same scale. And yet time and again we are nonsensically asked to give these two scenarios equal weight: often under the cloak of well-meaning phrases like “due process” and “innocent until proven guilty”. Yet the presumption of innocence is not a neutral stance in these cases. It presumes, by extension, that the accuser must be lying or mistaken unless proved otherwise. And in so doing, it provides generous cover to any abuser shrewd enough to cover their tracks. This is the landscape that virtually all victims of racism must navigate: suspicion, bad faith, institutional hostility. Meanwhile, football’s authorities wonder aloud why hatred festers in the game and what can be done about it. They can begin, above all, by assuming that those who stick out their neck to denounce racism are telling the truth. And not only that, but by believing them: not blindly or dogmatically, but instinctively, and with empathy. Jonathan Liew was last week awarded the John Bromley trophy for sports writer of the year at the Sports Journalism Awards © 2021 Guardian News & Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. (modern)
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  19. Aribo may have more natural ability, but Arfield contributes far more to the team.
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  20. M8 my playing days are long behind me at 65 but i played at a decent amateur level and played over here in Canada at a decent level with guys from all over the World. I liked a tackle in my day as that was something you prided yourself on , the ability to dish it out and take it back without screaming and rolling about like a wee lassie and i'll apologize right now to the lassies. But if what i'm watching in the modern day game , and yesterday in particular , in what passes for a foul and especially what happens in the penalty box then the game is a bogey , the cheats have won and i'm done as i'm to old now to be screaming at TV , Laptop screens for something that was never a foul in my day. I no longer recognize the game anymore.
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  21. & just us tims !!
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  22. Kamara's lawyer calling for a year long ban for the racist and them to be disqualified from the competition
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  23. I was 30 years old, remember taking flowers to the stadium before I went into work, was greetin like a baby. Strange how only certain players passing gets you that way. Remember seeing him a few times in a Hamilton Italian restaurant, heading up from Quarry St towards Low Watters Rd. Really civil man.
    4 likes
  24. So glad I got to see him play live, he was doing things with his feet (or foot should I say) that no other player in world football was doing with a ball in the early 80s I even went to a Motherwell game just to see him play. one word magic
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  25. Genius is an overused word in football but when Cooper turned it on he was unplayable.
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  26. He has to be seen to be selling it otherwise folk will think he’s easy
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  27. What he's essentially saying is he thinks the punishment for attempted murder should be a 2 year ban from playing football.
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  28. Remember that sad day like it was yesterday. Shed many a tear that day. He was my favourite Rangers player then, and always has been. GBNF
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  29. Anyone else baffled that they believe they were cheated out of a penalty? I've seen some of their fans annoyed because he dived but seems the majority think he Edouard was snapped in two or something. "He had no reason to go down" - Doesn't make it a penalty. "He wasn't touched but Barisic dived in" - Doesn't make it a penalty. He didn't have to avoid a reckless challenge, he was already clear of Borna when he realised Aribo was coming to clear his heavy touch and try to con the ref. I see people post up the clips of one of their podcasts and they genuinely believe Collum has cheated there I think most of us think the ref is biased against us because we watch a game supporting one of the sides on the pitch so your mind highlights the things going against you a lot more, however, I always try to think how I would have felt if it was against us. I think if anyone looks at that as if it happened in their own team's box, there's no way they think it's anything other than trying to con the ref.
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  30. Agree with that. At least an out of form Arfield contributes in terms of pressing and maintaining a defensive shape. Obviously you need more that that to start in the middle of the park for Rangers but Aribo when he isn't on it is a man down in all aspects of the game.
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  31. Brown off to the sheep. That will infuriate what passes for a football fan in that part of NE Scotland. Glass and Brown to star as the dream team ? Please let this be true.
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  32. That's what she said.
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  33. It's fuckin brilliant. He outclassed all of Brown's previous white with that one slap! Tbf to Brown too....he is a cunt, but he at least smiled knowing he'd been done up like a kipper!!
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  34. "Not a dive" FFS Must have been a sniper then. That is worse than I remember from yesterday. Fuck me, he should have been off for his second blatant dive of the game. Morelos gets ripped to shreds in the media for one of those, never mind 2 in the same game.
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  35. We simply have to accept the financial reality of our league, and unfortunately where we were only a few seasons ago. We just cannot be in that situation ever again. We have assembled a squad that is very capable for a relatively small outlay compared to other leagues. Prize money in the EPL is £150million for first place from the TV deal. We get > £3million for winning 55 and the TV rights are minuscule, as we have one of the worst TV deals in Europe. Even the Europa league money is not massive, but is hugely important to us. Our commercial arm is rapidly expanding again (at its peak it was the biggest on the UK) but it still gives us nowhere close to the finances of the EPL. That makes our performances all the more impressive. Unless a billionaire decides to put money into us we will sell players. That is the reality and what will happen. The plus side to that model is our scouting networks seem to have improved dramatically. Also with COVID there is less movement and I’d like to see younger players opt to move to us and play a season or two rather than go and sit in the reserves in the EPL.
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