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The Rangers Family – Estranged or Non-Existent


Frankie
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After another appalling and heartless performance at Ibrox on Saturday I read with interest that many fans felt booing wasn’t suitable and that we should be supporting the players as opposed to criticising them so publicly. In addition to that, there were further complaints of the general atmosphere being poor as well as the usual complaints about the ‘Subway Loyal’ leaving early.

Generally, one can understand these points of view but I think the prevailing reason for such differences of opinion is merely another symptom of the Rangers family breakdown. After another season of disappointment and under-achievement, player/club/fan relationships have never been so strained. Perhaps it’s one symptom of such declining communications but it really is becoming incredibly hard for the fans to find anything to relate to and indeed support per se.

In decades past, players were fans and lived similar lives to the support. Football wasn’t so glamorous and the money was nothing special. Hero worship was evident but not to the extent it is today. As European competitions begun and the TV and mass media started to take a real interest, profiles began to rise and higher reputations increased egos dangerously. From the Jim Baxter’s to the Willie Johnstone’s star quality was now part and parcel of a Rangers footballer’s life. As we approached the 21st Century the TV finance boom and the subsequent worldwide exposure of that and the internet meant footballers were front page icons and loved by people all over the world.

The Ally McCoist and Paul Gascoigne age started to take the players out of the reach of the fellow fan. Annual wages were now millions of pounds not thousands and fans weren’t as important as the agent or journalistic friend. The Bosman rule was next and money really started to take hold of our game. Not only that, it wasn’t just Scotsmen playing for Rangers but players from all over the world – many whom couldn’t even speak English never mind understand our traditions and history.

As such, with every passing year attitudes and relationships are changing. Who are our Rangers heroes nowadays? Barry Ferguson – a captain who doesn’t appear to be a leader? Dado Prso – a likeable chap whose career is all but finished? Nacho Novo – well he did say no to Celtic 3 years ago? Will we even have any great players next year? The kind of ability, charisma and pride that makes a player a Rangers legend certainly seems in short supply nowadays.

At the same time, these players are further from our reach. Increased technology and the problems that can bring means they are not allowed to attend RSC functions. VIP lounges means we can’t even buy them a pint and have a chat in our local pubs and clubs. Even when we do, we can’t understand what their life is like just as they can’t understand ours. Even the most average of players can earn more in a month that even the most skilled of us do in a year. Never have we been so far apart at the most basic of levels.

Ergo, do the players really care when we boo them? Do they even care when we cheer them? Similarly, can kissing the badge or the odd fleeting gesture appease us?

What about other figures at the club? An owner and chairman now semi-retired in France leaving an ill-equipped non-Rangers man to do a job he obviously struggles with. Even the so-called Rangers men still around prefer to lie and cover their boss’s tracks instead of standing up for the very people that loved them so much in years and eras long gone. Has the game changed so much that our greatest ever players are silent while our fans are kicked from pillar to post by sensationalist figures in the media? Or, like their fellow modern players, does the pound come before loyalty to the people who pay their wages?

All this is rather depressing but it’s also realistic and relevant. Last week our chairman appeared from nowhere to again plead with a small section of our fans to stop letting the club down. Of course he is right – the club should take priority over everything else. ‘Rangers First’ is the admirable message.

Perhaps the chairman and some of the highly paid strangers now at our club could use that ethos themselves. Then we might just be more of the family they often talk about enabling us to face the many challenges ahead of us as a bonded unit instead of a divided and despondent one.

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A Superb post, you could call it an article.

It just makes me look forward to meeting Frankie even more at Gerspride. Perhaps RST could invite the club captain.

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Very good post mate anybody who followed week in week out during the early eighties will remember the really dark days ie 8.500 against Dundee at Ibrox. What we need at the moment is a sense of defiance which unfortunately seems lacking among the younger element of our support. This might be sounding a bit boring cause i've posted this a couple of times before we WILL be back and with a bit of pride and support from everybody in the stands it will be sooner rather than later. Still think that SDM will put his hand in his pocket in the summer and by this time next year we'll be back on top. WE ARE THE PEOPLE.

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Great stuff Frankie, I agree with every word.

The relationship between the fans and the Club these days would have been unimaginable 25 years ago.

At a time when the the Club was at another low, but at least we were all together.

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25 years ago we had a main shareholder who lived in America, as far as I recall. He had little interest in Rangers. He did instigate a revolution under Holmes but pretty quickly thereafter sold the club on to David Murray. His predecessors weren't exactly "men of the people". I doubt they would have regarded the fans as somehow part of the same family as them.

The first person I can recall talking about "The Rangers Family" was Sir David. Soft soap, if you ask me. We're not a family - although, if we were, it certainly wouldn't stop us having arguments!

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25 years ago we had a main shareholder who lived in America, as far as I recall. He had little interest in Rangers. He did instigate a revolution under Holmes but pretty quickly thereafter sold the club on to David Murray. His predecessors weren't exactly "men of the people". I doubt they would have regarded the fans as somehow part of the same family as them.

The first person I can recall talking about "The Rangers Family" was Sir David. Soft soap, if you ask me. We're not a family - although, if we were, it certainly wouldn't stop us having arguments!

sir david does not know the meaning of the rangers family.we are just classed as orphans by sir david. <_<

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Mr Struth was Mr Rangers as was John Greig. Both of them knew what RFC was and is. So did Jock Wallace and Willie Waddell. Under their leadership we were a family.

Graeme Souness knew and his revolution was fantastic and SDM did know at one time, but he has grown tired of the whole thing IMO as he was primarily an investor. The current manager and his staff KNOW the RFC family, club + fans, but the players either do not know or do not care.

Times change and club policies regarding Catholics changed long ago. Unfortunately there is a hardcore die hard section of fans who are still living in the past in this regard and now are a danger to RFC.

Most fans can recognize the difference between tradition and anti-catholicism. Some however do not. Some would rather IMO prolong this hatred and bring down the club rather than change. They are very bitter. Others just like to cause trouble. That's where they get their kicks. They both are a threat as in this day and age they will not be tolerated by many with a lot of power.

WE all have to somehow get back this family atmosphere and that will not be easy. WE have to be more tolerant of each other's views, but then again what is banned is banned and must stay banned. We must move forward not backwards.

How we do this is unclear, but do it we must.

Priorities should be:

1. Letting SDM know that we all want to work TOGETHER and formalise policies in that regard. Self policing is a start, but IMO may not work. Stewards and Policemen SHOULD WORK IN CONCERT HERE AND DO WHAT THEY ARE PAID TO DO.

2. Fans should tell SDM that HE MUST speak up and defend us FORCIBLY when we are doing all WE can.

3. He must INVEST money in QUALITY players this summer. Another season with a poor squad will make an unhappy support even MORE unhappy.

4. He should clearly state HIS intentions re RFC.

This is a start.

What happens at away games may make or break RFC next season.

How that is handled will make a BIG difference. Self policing at away games - best bet is the SUPPORTER's ASSOCIATIONS and members on the buses. If they see one or more of their own acting irresponsibly then they must warn him and after one warning BAN him if he does not behave.

Other troublemakers on their own? Take pictures and/or report them to the police? Heavy handed - maybe, but what is the alternative?

Maybe have a "heavy squad" of say a dozen or two real supporters who at away games can have a polite word with any people starting trouble and nip it in the bud early. I do mean a polite word and nothing more.

All in all we are about to go through a tough period and things may get worse before they get better. Brace yourselves my friends.

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Guest orangpendek

i don't ever recall a family atmosphere at any scottish ground. we've been blinded a bit by the opening of the english game to the middle classes and women. that sort of market simply doesn't exist here and we'd be chasing a chimera if that was the target.

i don't know where the people in the media calling for good, clean rivalry between fans watched their football when growing up. it's always been about finding your rivals most deeply held beliefs, and then piddling on them with gusto. doesn't matter if you're a hearts fans, an arbraoth fan or a beith juniors fan, that's what it's always been about.

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25 years ago we had a main shareholder who lived in America, as far as I recall. He had little interest in Rangers. He did instigate a revolution under Holmes but pretty quickly thereafter sold the club on to David Murray. His predecessors weren't exactly "men of the people". I doubt they would have regarded the fans as somehow part of the same family as them.

The first person I can recall talking about "The Rangers Family" was Sir David. Soft soap, if you ask me. We're not a family - although, if we were, it certainly wouldn't stop us having arguments!

I have no problem with an owner 'managing' his business from afar by utilising an effective chief executive to deal with the day-to-day running of the club.

David Holmes was capable of that important job. Martin Bain is not.

In addition, at least when Malborough knew he was planning to sell he made the club attractive as possible by showing some ambitious plans for the short-term to attract buyers and fans back to the club. I don't think David Murray is doing that. Instead he is in a 42,000 season ticket holders per season comfort zone whilst our club slides slowly into oblivion.

SDM has to make his mind up here. He either wants to sell or he doesn't. If he wants to sell (and genuinely loves the club) he should be prepared to make one last signal of intent by A) investing enough money into the team to improve our title prospects and B) looking for a sum of money that can be affordable to the interested parties while enabling them to further invest into the club at the same time.

Many Rangers fans see David Murray as a legendary figure. To all of us, he was the one man that helped ensure 9iar and the big name players that came with that. To some of us, he is also the one man that helped ensure a £80million debt and the sporadic success since. Now he can be remembered 2 ways - fondly or negatively. With every passing minute I move from the former to the latter. I won't be the only one to do so.

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Cant argue with any of that....splendid statement

Those barstewards who operate the club we love treat the individual fan and even more concerning the fans collectively with utter contempt

The only way to sort them out is to vote with our feet, its painful but its the only way

Who has the balls for it ?

Come on we did it in the late 70s and got a response for the men upstairs so what do we have to lose anyway the situation is pathetic....is it not ?

What do you think the sly devious one would do if a very large percentage of season tickets were not renewed and the stadium had only a couple of thousand for each match....he would soon get his finger oot his erse coz he would then start to get the message, the all important money to him is no longer coming in.

Maybe some of you want RFC to be like this for the forseeable future but that up to you

We have that power so lets apply it

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FISH:

Hitting SDM in the pocket is the only language he knows. However, despite 2 poor seasons and the various other problems we face, season ticket sales remain at record levels. The league title was pretty much gone by Xmas, yet the club were still selling half-season tickets for the rest of this term without problem.

As such, although some sort of renewal protest is one idea with merit - quite simply the chances it will work are minimal, if not nil. That's disappointing but that's why we need to continue the necessary dialogue with him to try and force change diplomatically.

It's a slow and gradual process but it is working bit by bit. Admissions are gained, observations acted upon and changes implemented from time to time. We must continue that strategy until something else is possible.

PS: Thanks to all the new Trust members from RM. It hasn't gone unnoticed the number of you joining up lately! Much appreciated!

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Nice post Frankie but nothing new. Any Rangers supporter worth his salt knows things change in football and we are just as susceptible to it as anyone else. The days of us being a special family have gone. Whether this is because of the reasons you have stated or not I don't know. What I do know is there is a different atmosphere at Ibrox now and one I for one don't appreciate it. I have never known the place so quiet so often. I just think the type of new support demands success or they go in the huff and therefore don't take any responsibility hence the break up of the 'family'. Better win something quick or these supporters might not come back and look for a winning side to nail their colours to. Thank god I appreciate what Rangers mean to me and others and I will never stop shouting encouragement through thick and thin. I have loved this club all my life and I would rather die than boo anyone in the famous colours. :angry2:

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How come SDM always refers to this family then?

Would you say Celtic have a family type scenario given their complete backing for the fans despite a similar poor atmosphere at their home games?

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How come SDM always refers to this family then?

Would you say Celtic have a family type scenario given their complete backing for the fans despite a similar poor atmosphere at their home games?

Unfotuneately the word 'family' is used as a PR exercise by SDM to show hes just like us and only has the good of the club at heart and of course we have to believe him ?

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Would you say Celtic have a family type scenario given their complete backing for the fans despite a similar poor atmosphere at their home games?

Most of them are actually family due to the inbreeding that goes on in the east end :D

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Would you say Celtic have a family type scenario given their complete backing for the fans despite a similar poor atmosphere at their home games?

Most of them are actually family due to the inbreeding that goes on in the east end :D

well said dado :lol::lol:

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After another appalling and heartless performance at Ibrox on Saturday I read with interest that many fans felt booing wasn’t suitable and that we should be supporting the players as opposed to criticising them so publicly. In addition to that, there were further complaints of the general atmosphere being poor as well as the usual complaints about the ‘Subway Loyal’ leaving early.

Generally, one can understand these points of view but I think the prevailing reason for such differences of opinion is merely another symptom of the Rangers family breakdown. After another season of disappointment and under-achievement, player/club/fan relationships have never been so strained. Perhaps it’s one symptom of such declining communications but it really is becoming incredibly hard for the fans to find anything to relate to and indeed support per se.

In decades past, players were fans and lived similar lives to the support. Football wasn’t so glamorous and the money was nothing special. Hero worship was evident but not to the extent it is today. As European competitions begun and the TV and mass media started to take a real interest, profiles began to rise and higher reputations increased egos dangerously. From the Jim Baxter’s to the Willie Johnstone’s star quality was now part and parcel of a Rangers footballer’s life. As we approached the 21st Century the TV finance boom and the subsequent worldwide exposure of that and the internet meant footballers were front page icons and loved by people all over the world.

The Ally McCoist and Paul Gascoigne age started to take the players out of the reach of the fellow fan. Annual wages were now millions of pounds not thousands and fans weren’t as important as the agent or journalistic friend. The Bosman rule was next and money really started to take hold of our game. Not only that, it wasn’t just Scotsmen playing for Rangers but players from all over the world – many whom couldn’t even speak English never mind understand our traditions and history.

As such, with every passing year attitudes and relationships are changing. Who are our Rangers heroes nowadays? Barry Ferguson – a captain who doesn’t appear to be a leader? Dado Prso – a likeable chap whose career is all but finished? Nacho Novo – well he did say no to Celtic 3 years ago? Will we even have any great players next year? The kind of ability, charisma and pride that makes a player a Rangers legend certainly seems in short supply nowadays.

At the same time, these players are further from our reach. Increased technology and the problems that can bring means they are not allowed to attend RSC functions. VIP lounges means we can’t even buy them a pint and have a chat in our local pubs and clubs. Even when we do, we can’t understand what their life is like just as they can’t understand ours. Even the most average of players can earn more in a month that even the most skilled of us do in a year. Never have we been so far apart at the most basic of levels.

Ergo, do the players really care when we boo them? Do they even care when we cheer them? Similarly, can kissing the badge or the odd fleeting gesture appease us?

What about other figures at the club? An owner and chairman now semi-retired in France leaving an ill-equipped non-Rangers man to do a job he obviously struggles with. Even the so-called Rangers men still around prefer to lie and cover their boss’s tracks instead of standing up for the very people that loved them so much in years and eras long gone. Has the game changed so much that our greatest ever players are silent while our fans are kicked from pillar to post by sensationalist figures in the media? Or, like their fellow modern players, does the pound come before loyalty to the people who pay their wages?

All this is rather depressing but it’s also realistic and relevant. Last week our chairman appeared from nowhere to again plead with a small section of our fans to stop letting the club down. Of course he is right – the club should take priority over everything else. ‘Rangers First’ is the admirable message.

Perhaps the chairman and some of the highly paid strangers now at our club could use that ethos themselves. Then we might just be more of the family they often talk about enabling us to face the many challenges ahead of us as a bonded unit instead of a divided and despondent one.

5 star post Frankie (clap)

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