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Ranger fight SFA in court over ban


Jonok
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It is prohibited by Fifa for a club to take its association to the civil courts. Fifa rules dictate that the national association must expel any club which takes this action. In December last year the international body threatened to expel the Swiss FA from world football unless it set a deadline to expel Sion after the club took action in its local civil court.

This action can surely only be to provoke the SFA into bringing this sorry saga to an end by kicking them out of the game before Duff and Phelps are forced to padlock the doors due to their own failures.

Interesting...so the SFA might agree

To lift the embargo if we drop the court case so that the SFA arent banned from FIFA....possible?

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It is prohibited by Fifa for a club to take its association to the civil courts. Fifa rules dictate that the national association must expel any club which takes this action. In December last year the international body threatened to expel the Swiss FA from world football unless it set a deadline to expel Sion after the club took action in its local civil court.

This action can surely only be to provoke the SFA into bringing this sorry saga to an end by kicking them out of the game before Duff and Phelps are forced to padlock the doors due to their own failures.

and once again the rangers are more important to you than your own child molesting institution.get tae fuck.

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All we need now is for several of the old board, to take the SFA on through the coutrs seperately. so that we are fighting the corrupt bassas on four or five fronts. The SFA called them liars and made guesses about their honesty surely that is defamation.

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Rest of the teams being banned from Europe is something i'd have felt uncomfortable about a few months ago.

But after the response to our problems from all these teams and their fans I'd actually laugh my head off.

Me too, but karma can be a real bitch sometimes. They dont care about us, so i dont care about them.

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It is prohibited by Fifa for a club to take its association to the civil courts. Fifa rules dictate that the national association must expel any club which takes this action. In December last year the international body threatened to expel the Swiss FA from world football unless it set a deadline to expel Sion after the club took action in its local civil court.

This action can surely only be to provoke the SFA into bringing this sorry saga to an end by kicking them out of the game before Duff and Phelps are forced to padlock the doors due to their own failures.

You will have to discuss that with the humdinger, I believe he has been elected chairman today, you and he seem to be attending the same pokery/chapel as you are singing from the same hymn book. :rolleyes:

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A huge thank you to the guys involved in the RFFF who are the driving force behind our defence and pursuit of justice in this matter.

Make no mistake, left to D&P alone, this course of action would not have been taken. It is the RFFF who are pushing this action and they get my thanks.

Of course it all takes money to do these things, and anyone looking to also say thanks to the RFFF for fighting on our behalf in court today can of course still donate on the links at the top of the page in the BD.

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I struggle to understand this action, unless a newco and the resulting 3 years out of Europe is a certainty . we must also be sure of our place in the spl if we are wanting to overturn the transfer embargo. if neither of these facts are true then its a very strange course of action . as fifa and uefa Will no doubt put pressure on the sfa to deal with us like they demanded of the swiss fa. may even make other clubs want to punish us more.

maybe green has suggested that the transfer embargo may mean he is considering his position and panicked duff and phelps ?

I really struggle to understand why we would consider bring the wrath of fifa and uefa down on us at this point in time . . . . maybe I have miss read the situation ?

Sensible answer .Just don't get why we want to make more enemies but I'm up for any fight back against our many haters .I want to just by my season ticket but this whole mess is farsical .Can only see us coming off worse if Uefa get involved

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Aidan Oneill QC for the SFA

No more to be said

Aidan O'Neill is an interesting choice.

A Scottish catholic and a product of the sectarian Scottish education system, whose parents taught in that system, he grew up confused about his national identity. Catholicism was the one identity he could be sure of - marking solidarity with the oppressed, down-trodden immigrants.

He denounces the children of the Reformation for their denouncing of the catholic tyranny it superseded, and sees the history since the Reformation as the "dominant cultural myth" of his formative years.

Don't believe me?

Read it for yourself in his article in The Tablet, a weekly catholic journal.

I wonder whether he is a Rangers supporter. :rolleyes:

http://www.thetablet.co.uk/page/renderinguntocaesar2

2.1 I am a lawyer. I practise in the area of human rights. I have a particular interest in European and constitutional law. I am also a Catholic, although to understand that last statement it is perhaps necessary to unpack more of my personal history and upbringing.

2.2 My Catholicism is, in one sense, tribal. I was born into it - as the sixth of nine children, all but one of whom survived to adulthood. My parents were Catholics of good standing, both teachers in the wholly State-funded Catholic school sector in Scotland. The Catholicism into which I was born was Scottish Catholicism, which by the time I was born was composed primarily of third or fourth generation descendants of immigrants to Scotland, predominantly from Ireland but also from Italy, Lithuania, Poland and the Ukraine. Catholics in the west central belt of Scotland where I was brought up sometimes comprised 50% and over of the predominantly coal-mining and steel-producing communities in which they lived, but taking Scotland as a whole, the proportion of Catholics was just under 20%. Catholics in Scotland when I was growing up were overwhelmingly working class in culture, although there were also the beginnings of a Catholic middle class, school teachers, publicans and criminal lawyers being in the vanguard of its creation.

2.3 Growing up Catholic in Scotland in the 1960s involved, however, a series of "not-belongings" or dislocations. One didn't feel wholly Scottish, since the then dominant cultural myth of what it was to be Scottish seemed to be one that commenced with the Reformation of 1560 and John Knox denouncing Mary, Queen of Scots for her "foreign harlotry". Despite many of our forenames and surnames, we didn't feel ourselves to be Irish - they had a different accent and attitude to life, and a wholly different politics and history. We were certainly not English. But even any sense of "Britishness" was fraught with difficulties, given that we knew that the Monarch vowed to uphold the Protestant religion and would lose any claim to the throne on becoming or marrying a Catholic.

2.4 The one identity one could be sure of, however, was one's being a Catholic. And the Church we experienced - as a minority Church in a historically hostile land - was one marked by solidarity with the poor, the down-trodden, the immigrant, the oppressed. Our Church gained moral authority and respect for that. We had little, if any, of the oppressive experiences which marked Irish Catholicism in the age of DeValera where strong social and political power rested in (and was abused by) members of the clergy and religious. Instead, to identify as a Catholic in Scotland, was to identify with the powerless and those discriminated against. It was to accept a calling to witness to truth and to fight against injustice. It was all one seamless web.

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I think if we can get a CVA agreed then the transfer ban will be lifted.

The reason the transfer ban was issued was due to the fact we still owed money to other teams for players and none of the money we owed was to due to be paid prior to us going into admin, am I right in saying that the magority of the money owed to other clubs was perhaps just prior to the new season kicking off?

I am sure I heard on the radio that regardless of us reaching a CVA agreement we would still have to pay the money we owed to clubs for players in full to remain in the SPL and UEFA.

So we would effectivly have to pay the other football teams in full after we are back on our feet at the original date but the SFA still want a transfer ban.

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So is it correct and we can expect some form of statements regarding this from the sfa, plz tell me it's true those crummy cunts cant compete in europe, will the sfa now drop if we do etc

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Aidan O'Neill is an interesting choice.

A Scottish catholic and a product of the sectarian Scottish education system, whose parents taught in that system, he grew up confused about his national identity. Catholicism was the one identity he could be sure of - marking solidarity with the oppressed, down-trodden immigrants.

He denounces the children of the Reformation for their denouncing of the catholic tyranny it superseded, and sees the history since the Reformation as the "dominant cultural myth" of his formative years.

Don't believe me?

Read it for yourself in his article in The Tablet, a weekly catholic journal.

I wonder whether he is a Rangers supporter. :rolleyes:

http://www.thetablet.co.uk/page/renderinguntocaesar2

2.1 I am a lawyer. I practise in the area of human rights. I have a particular interest in European and constitutional law. I am also a Catholic, although to understand that last statement it is perhaps necessary to unpack more of my personal history and upbringing.

2.2 My Catholicism is, in one sense, tribal. I was born into it - as the sixth of nine children, all but one of whom survived to adulthood. My parents were Catholics of good standing, both teachers in the wholly State-funded Catholic school sector in Scotland. The Catholicism into which I was born was Scottish Catholicism, which by the time I was born was composed primarily of third or fourth generation descendants of immigrants to Scotland, predominantly from Ireland but also from Italy, Lithuania, Poland and the Ukraine. Catholics in the west central belt of Scotland where I was brought up sometimes comprised 50% and over of the predominantly coal-mining and steel-producing communities in which they lived, but taking Scotland as a whole, the proportion of Catholics was just under 20%. Catholics in Scotland when I was growing up were overwhelmingly working class in culture, although there were also the beginnings of a Catholic middle class, school teachers, publicans and criminal lawyers being in the vanguard of its creation.

2.3 Growing up Catholic in Scotland in the 1960s involved, however, a series of "not-belongings" or dislocations. One didn't feel wholly Scottish, since the then dominant cultural myth of what it was to be Scottish seemed to be one that commenced with the Reformation of 1560 and John Knox denouncing Mary, Queen of Scots for her "foreign harlotry". Despite many of our forenames and surnames, we didn't feel ourselves to be Irish - they had a different accent and attitude to life, and a wholly different politics and history. We were certainly not English. But even any sense of "Britishness" was fraught with difficulties, given that we knew that the Monarch vowed to uphold the Protestant religion and would lose any claim to the throne on becoming or marrying a Catholic.

2.4 The one identity one could be sure of, however, was one's being a Catholic. And the Church we experienced - as a minority Church in a historically hostile land - was one marked by solidarity with the poor, the down-trodden, the immigrant, the oppressed. Our Church gained moral authority and respect for that. We had little, if any, of the oppressive experiences which marked Irish Catholicism in the age of DeValera where strong social and political power rested in (and was abused by) members of the clergy and religious. Instead, to identify as a Catholic in Scotland, was to identify with the powerless and those discriminated against. It was to accept a calling to witness to truth and to fight against injustice. It was all one seamless web.

So the jury's still out on this guy then :lol: :lol:

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Aidan O'Neill is an interesting choice.

A Scottish catholic and a product of the sectarian Scottish education system, whose parents taught in that system, he grew up confused about his national identity. Catholicism was the one identity he could be sure of - marking solidarity with the oppressed, down-trodden immigrants.

He denounces the children of the Reformation for their denouncing of the catholic tyranny it superseded, and sees the history since the Reformation as the "dominant cultural myth" of his formative years.

Don't believe me?

Read it for yourself in his article in The Tablet, a weekly catholic journal.

I wonder whether he is a Rangers supporter. :rolleyes:

http://www.thetablet.co.uk/page/renderinguntocaesar2

2.1 I am a lawyer. I practise in the area of human rights. I have a particular interest in European and constitutional law. I am also a Catholic, although to understand that last statement it is perhaps necessary to unpack more of my personal history and upbringing.

2.2 My Catholicism is, in one sense, tribal. I was born into it - as the sixth of nine children, all but one of whom survived to adulthood. My parents were Catholics of good standing, both teachers in the wholly State-funded Catholic school sector in Scotland. The Catholicism into which I was born was Scottish Catholicism, which by the time I was born was composed primarily of third or fourth generation descendants of immigrants to Scotland, predominantly from Ireland but also from Italy, Lithuania, Poland and the Ukraine. Catholics in the west central belt of Scotland where I was brought up sometimes comprised 50% and over of the predominantly coal-mining and steel-producing communities in which they lived, but taking Scotland as a whole, the proportion of Catholics was just under 20%. Catholics in Scotland when I was growing up were overwhelmingly working class in culture, although there were also the beginnings of a Catholic middle class, school teachers, publicans and criminal lawyers being in the vanguard of its creation.

2.3 Growing up Catholic in Scotland in the 1960s involved, however, a series of "not-belongings" or dislocations. One didn't feel wholly Scottish, since the then dominant cultural myth of what it was to be Scottish seemed to be one that commenced with the Reformation of 1560 and John Knox denouncing Mary, Queen of Scots for her "foreign harlotry". Despite many of our forenames and surnames, we didn't feel ourselves to be Irish - they had a different accent and attitude to life, and a wholly different politics and history. We were certainly not English. But even any sense of "Britishness" was fraught with difficulties, given that we knew that the Monarch vowed to uphold the Protestant religion and would lose any claim to the throne on becoming or marrying a Catholic.

2.4 The one identity one could be sure of, however, was one's being a Catholic. And the Church we experienced - as a minority Church in a historically hostile land - was one marked by solidarity with the poor, the down-trodden, the immigrant, the oppressed. Our Church gained moral authority and respect for that. We had little, if any, of the oppressive experiences which marked Irish Catholicism in the age of DeValera where strong social and political power rested in (and was abused by) members of the clergy and religious. Instead, to identify as a Catholic in Scotland, was to identify with the powerless and those discriminated against. It was to accept a calling to witness to truth and to fight against injustice. It was all one seamless web.

Ffs. Here we go, another god bothered with imaginary pals and a 55 pun bag o totties on each shoulder. doh

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It is prohibited by Fifa for a club to take its association to the civil courts. Fifa rules dictate that the national association must expel any club which takes this action. In December last year the international body threatened to expel the Swiss FA from world football unless it set a deadline to expel Sion after the club took action in its local civil court.

This action can surely only be to provoke the SFA into bringing this sorry saga to an end by kicking them out of the game before Duff and Phelps are forced to padlock the doors due to their own failures.

I am just going to discuss this for a moment.

First, Sion has not been expelled from the Swiss FA.

Second, in 2001, FIFA and UEFA made a commitment to the European Court to adapt their statutes to the rules of civil justice. Clearly, this has not happened because 'catch all' crimes such as bringing the game into disrepute are not viewed kindly by civil justice.

Third, it is a basic right in a democratic society to have recourse to law. UEFA/FIFA have tried to get around this by having the CAS as the supreme arbiter and by getting its competency recognised by various jurisdictions. However, there is no law that requires a club to go to the CAS and an attempt to force that through sanctions might be interpreted as contempt of court. Indeed, in this context, Sion made a criminal complaint of 'constraint' against Platini and Gianini.

The Sion case was, of course, different. First, their dispute was over a FIFA transfer ban and being excluded from a UEFA competition. The Swiss FA was not a major player. Also, Sion agreed to go to the CAS where they lost. Because Swiss jurisprudence recognises the CAS as competent, they no longer had a claim under Swiss (Vaudois) law.

There are a couple of other issues here. Financially, Scottish football does not want to lose Rangers. I think enough people recognise the damage this would do. So Rangers have a decent amount of leverage. Secondly, it is one thing for UEFA to go head to head with Swiss law (specifically the Canton of Vaud). It is quite another to go head to head with the EU. They have done this before and lost with serious consequences. So, rather than try to force sanctions, I would have thought that an amicable resolution is in everyones interests.

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