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Walter Tull (First world war era)


McBoyd
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Just a random interesting piece of history for you, one of our ex players, first black officer in the british army!

RIP Walter :unionflag:

(Actually another source says this about him though, " It was reported in newspapers that Tull had signed to play for Rangers once the war was over.", meaning he wasn't ACTUALLY one of our players, but was going to sign for us, odd!)

waltertull2.jpg

Walter Tull, was another outstanding footballer who abandoned his career and offered his services to the British Army. Tull,joined the 1st Football Battalion of the Middlesex Regiment.

The Army soon recognised Tull's leadership qualities and he was promoted to the rank of sergeant. In July 1916, Tull took part in the major Somme offensive. Tull survived this experience but in December 1916 he developed trench fever and was sent home to England to recover.

Tull had impressed his senior officers and recommended that he should be considered for further promotion. When he recovered from his illness, instead of being sent back to France, he went to the officer training school at Gailes in Scotland. Despite military regulations forbidding "any negro or person of colour" being an officer, Tull received his commission in May, 1917.

Lieutenant Tull was sent to the Italian front. This was an historic occasion because Tull was the first ever black officer in the British Army. He led his men at the Battle of Piave and was mentioned in dispatches for his "gallantry and coolness" under fire.

Walter Tull stayed in Italy until 1918 when he was transferred to France to take part in the attempt to break through the German lines on the Western Front. On 25th March, 1918, 2nd Lieutenant Tull was ordered to lead his men on an attack on the German trenches at Favreuil. Soon after entering No Mans Land Tull was hit by a German bullet. Tull was such a popular officer that several of his men made valiant efforts under heavy fire from German machine-guns to bring him back to the British trenches. These efforts were in vain as Tull had died soon after being hit. Tull's body was never found.

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BBC did a documentary and a dramtisation on him not so long ago.

True British legend and a gent. Made for Rangers. A real hero.

Do you know if he played for us, or wether the above bit i found on Wikipedia that said "he was to sign for rangers AFTER the war" is true?

Two different places say different things.

I'll search out that documentary, see if i can find anything, cheers!

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BBC did a documentary and a dramtisation on him not so long ago.

True British legend and a gent. Made for Rangers. A real hero.

Do you know if he played for us, or wether the above bit i found on Wikipedia that said "he was to sign for rangers AFTER the war" is true?

Two different places say different things.

I'll search out that documentary, see if i can find anything, cheers!

I understand he played a couple of friendlies, but never got to play competitively for us.

Nonetheless, he's a very important figure in British history and I'd like to see us commemorate him, beyond the Walter Tull Cup.

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Just a random interesting piece of history for you, one of our ex players, first black officer in the british army!

RIP Walter :unionflag:

(Actually another source says this about him though, " It was reported in newspapers that Tull had signed to play for Rangers once the war was over.", meaning he wasn't ACTUALLY one of our players, but was going to sign for us, odd!)

waltertull2.jpg

Walter Tull, was another outstanding footballer who abandoned his career and offered his services to the British Army. Tull,joined the 1st Football Battalion of the Middlesex Regiment.

The Army soon recognised Tull's leadership qualities and he was promoted to the rank of sergeant. In July 1916, Tull took part in the major Somme offensive. Tull survived this experience but in December 1916 he developed trench fever and was sent home to England to recover.

Tull had impressed his senior officers and recommended that he should be considered for further promotion. When he recovered from his illness, instead of being sent back to France, he went to the officer training school at Gailes in Scotland. Despite military regulations forbidding "any negro or person of colour" being an officer, Tull received his commission in May, 1917.

Lieutenant Tull was sent to the Italian front. This was an historic occasion because Tull was the first ever black officer in the British Army. He led his men at the Battle of Piave and was mentioned in dispatches for his "gallantry and coolness" under fire.

Walter Tull stayed in Italy until 1918 when he was transferred to France to take part in the attempt to break through the German lines on the Western Front. On 25th March, 1918, 2nd Lieutenant Tull was ordered to lead his men on an attack on the German trenches at Favreuil. Soon after entering No Mans Land Tull was hit by a German bullet. Tull was such a popular officer that several of his men made valiant efforts under heavy fire from German machine-guns to bring him back to the British trenches. These efforts were in vain as Tull had died soon after being hit. Tull's body was never found.

Thanks for breaking it down for me. (tu)

http://forum.rangersmedia.co.uk//index.php?showtopic=95197

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