Jump to content

Juventus adversity v Rangers adversity


weejock

Recommended Posts

Calciopoli scandal

Fabio Capello was appointed as Juventus' coach in 2004 and led the club to two more consecutive Serie A first places. In May 2006, Juventus became one of the five clubs linked to a 2006 Italian football scandal, the result of which saw the club placed at the bottom of the league table and relegated to Serie B for the first time in its history. The club was also stripped of the 2005 title won under Capello, while the 2006 title, after a period sub judice, was assigned to Inter Milan.[47]

Many key players left following their relegation to Serie B, including Lillian Thuram, star striker Zlatan Ibrahimović and defensive stalwart Fabio Cannavaro. However, other big name players such as Alessandro Del Piero, Gianluigi Buffon, David Trezeguet and Pavel Nedvěd remained to help the club return to Serie A, while youngsters from the Primavera (youth team), such as Sebastian Giovinco and Claudio Marchisio, were integrated into the first team. Juventus won the Cadetti (Serie B championship) and gained promotion straight back up to the top division as league winners after the 2006–07 season,[48] as captain Del Piero claimed the top scorer award with 21 goals.

Star goalkeeeper Gianluigi Buffon was among a group of players who remained with the club following their demotion to Serie B in 2006.

As early as 2010, Juventus considered challenging the stripping of their scudetto from 2005 and the non-assignment of the 2006 title, dependent on the results of trials connected to the 2006 scandal.[49] When former general manager Luciano Moggi's conviction in criminal court in connection with the scandal was partially written off by the Supreme Court on 23 March 2015,[50] the club sued the Italian Football Federation (FIGC) for €443 million for damages caused by their 2006 relegation. FIGC president Carlo Tavecchio offered to discuss reinstatement of the lost scudetti in exchange for Juventus dropping the lawsuit.[51] On 9 September 2015, the Supreme Court released a 150-page document that explained its final ruling of the case: despite that Moggi's remaining charges were cancelled without a new trial due to statute of limitations,[50] the court confirmed that Moggi was actively involved in the sporting fraud which was intended to favor Juventus and increase his own personal benefits.[52] Eventually, in 2016 the TAR tribunal rejected the request of compensation promoted by Juventus.[53]

Return to Serie A[edit]

After returning to Serie A in the 2007–08 season, Juventus appointed Claudio Ranieri as manager.[54] They finished in third place in their first season back in the top flight and qualified for the Champions League third qualifying round in the preliminary stages. Juventus reached the group stages, where they beat Real Madrid in both home and away legs, before losing in the knockout round to Chelsea. Ranieri was sacked following a string of unsuccessful results and Ciro Ferrara was appointed as manager on a temporary basis for the last two games of the 2008–09 season,[55] before being subsequently appointed as the manager for the 2009–10 season.[56]

Ferrara's stint as Juventus manager, however, proved to be unsuccessful, with Juventus knocked out of Champions League and Coppa Italia, as well as just lying on the sixth place in the league table at the end of January 2010, leading to the dismissal of Ferrara and the naming of Alberto Zaccheroni as caretaker manager. Zaccheroni could not help the side improve, as Juventus finished the season in seventh place in Serie A. For the 2010–11 season, Jean-Claude Blanc was replaced by Andrea Agnelli as the club's president. Agnelli's first action was to replace Zaccheroni and director of sport Alessio Secco with Sampdoria manager Luigi Delneri and director of sport Giuseppe Marotta.[57] However, Delneri failed to improve their fortunes and was dismissed. Former player and fan favourite Antonio Conte, fresh after winning promotion with Siena, was named as Delneri's replacement.[58] In September 2011, Juventus relocated to the new Juventus Stadium.[59]

Historic four consecutive doubles and eight consecutive league titles[edit]

Playmaker Andrea Pirlo playing for Juventus in 2012

With Conte as manager, Juventus went unbeaten for the entire 2011–12 Serie A season. Towards the second half of the season, the team was mostly competing with northern rivals Milan for first place in a tight contest. Juventus won the title on the 37th matchday after beating Cagliari 2–0 and Milan losing to Internazionale 4–2. After a 3–1 win in the final matchday against Atalanta, Juventus became the first team to go the season unbeaten in the current 38-game format.[60] Other noteworthy achievements included the biggest away win (5–0 at Fiorentina), best defensive record (20 goals conceded, fewest ever in the current league format) in Serie A and second best in the top six European leagues that year.[61] In 2013–14, Juventus won a third consecutive scudetto with a record 102 points and 33 wins.[62][63] The title was the 30th official league championship in the club's history.[64] They also achieved the semi-finals of Europa League, where they were eliminated at home against ten-man Benfica's catenaccio, missing the final at the Juventus Stadium.[65][66]

Juventus captain Giorgio Chiellini receives the 2017 Coppa Italia from the President of Italy Sergio Mattarella

In 2014–15, Massimiliano Allegri was appointed as manager, with whom Juventus won their 31st official title, making it a fourth-straight, as well as achieving a record tenth Coppa Italia for the double.[67] The club also beat Real Madrid in the semi finals of the Champions League 3–2 on aggregate to face Barcelona in the final in Berlin for the first time since the 2002–03 Champions League.[68] Juventus lost the final to Barcelona 3–1 after an early fourth-minute goal from Ivan Rakitić, followed by an Álvaro Morata equalizer in the 55th minute. Then Barcelona took the lead again with a goal from Luis Suárez in the 70th minute, followed by a final minute goal by Neymar as Juventus were caught out on the counterattack.[69] On 14 December 2015, Juventus won the Serie A Football Club of the Year award for the 2014–15 season, the fourth time in succession.[70] On 25 April 2016, the club won their fifth-straight title (and 32nd overall) since last winning five-straight between 1930–31 and 1934–35, after second place Napoli lost to Roma to give Juventus mathematical certainty of the title with three games to spare; last losing to Sassuolo on 25 October 2015, which left them in 12th place, before taking 73 points of a possible 75.[71] On 21 May, the club then won the Coppa Italia for the 11th time and their second-straight title, becoming the first team in Italy's history to complete Serie A and Coppa Italia doubles in back-to-back seasons.[72][73][74]

On 17 May 2017, Juventus won their 12th Coppa Italia title in a 2–0 win over Lazio (the first team to win three consecutive championships).[75] Four days later on 21 May, Juventus became the first team to win six consecutive Serie A titles.[76] On 3 June 2017, Juventus reached a second Champions League Final in three years, but were defeated 1–4 by defending champions Real Madrid—a stampede in Turin happened ten minutes before the end of the match.[77][78] On 9 May 2018, Juventus won their 13th Coppa Italia title, and fourth in a row, in a 4–0 win over Milan, extending the all-time record of successive Coppa Italia titles.[79] Four days later on 13 May, Juventus secured their seventh consecutive Serie A title, extending the all-time record of successive triumphs in the competition.[80] In July 2018, Juventus broke the record for a fee paid for a player over 30 years old and the record for a fee paid by an Italian club by purchasing the 33 year old Cristiano Ronaldo from Real Madrid for €112 million, or £99.2 million.[81] On 20 April 2019, Juventus secured their eighth consecutive Serie A title, further extending the all-time record of successive triumphs in the competition.[82]

 

 

It’s always interested me the comparison between Juventus’ achievements from adversity and what the Gers are trying to achieve from even greater adversity to now.

It took Juventus from 2006 until 2012 before they won back the Italian Championships. In that 2011/12 season, Juventus went the entire league season unbeaten.

The biggest difference to them from us was that they just went down one league, whereas we went down to the Scottish third division. So it has taken us a few seasons more to be finally challenging at the top. We went down in the 2012/13 season and are now trailing celtic by one point, doing fine in Europe for the second year in succession and playing our best football in years.

Juventus eventually got Antonio Conte as their manager who took them to a different level. We now have Steven Gerrard who, in my opinion will have the same effect on the Gers.

Conte although ten years older than Gerard will have played midfield for Italy against Gerard for England and possibly at club level too. Lets hope Stevie can follow in his managerial footsteps too.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like something Graham Spiers would write.

Juventus were using drugs banned in sport to gain a competitive advantage.  Spiers was on radio back in 2012 comparing Rangers to the Juventus situation calling it “financial doping”.   I believe that’s where the phrase came from,

Link to post
Share on other sites

Juventus were supposed to start Serie B on minus 30 points as well and had it reduced on appeal.

Pretty sure there was a few clubs supposed to go down with them but their appeals saw them avoiding relegation and just getting points deductions instead.

 

We had fuckall like that.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I’m arguing that the Taigs have benefitted from “financial doping” for 40-50 years now. Not speaking up about the paedophilia stuff kept their share price up, sponsors interested, season ticket holder numbers etc. If it had come out sooner then these 3 things (amongst others) would’ve impacted them financially...no doubt in my mind.

Will we see the paedo protectors thrown down to the depths of Scottish Football for their “financial doping” in the interests of “sporting integrity”?. Oi, Petrie, can you answer my question please ya poisonous little rat?...

Politicians answer incoming...

Link to post
Share on other sites

 There can be no real comparison with any other team really .... as what happened to us was unique and we were abandoned by all teams in all the leagues ..... plus their supporters ..... and also the governing bodies who went out of there way to handicap us with so many sanctions .... some so ridiculous that we were crippled and were on the verge of collapsing ...... all led by the beasts from the east ..... who .... with all their contacts in the game are not finished yet.

So for me .... we stand alone .... and had it not been for our support over this seriously difficult period  they may well have succeeded ...... but they didn't and this is another of those world records we continue to beat and is also proof that we are unique ..... so I repeat .... we can not really be compared to others ...... especially the criminally bereft who got off lightly.

Nobody likes us and we really do not fucking care.

🇬🇧 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Stopped reading at the title

Adversity for Juventus? You must be fucking joking

They are cheating scumbags, they’re probably still at it the now and they should’ve had far more punishment than going down 1 division 

Fuck Juventus.

Link to post
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, bigblueyonder said:

I'd have said what happened to Napoli was more like our situation.

Genuine question,What happened at Napoli?

Did every club want them kicked out in the name of sporting integrity 

Link to post
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, DBBTB said:

It’s a safe assumption to make. Look at Fiorentina. When they went to the wall and had to start in the fourth tier the only player who stayed with them was Angelo Di Livio.

It’s still hypothetical though. You’re probably right tbf, but we’ll never know

Link to post
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, murzo said:

Genuine question,What happened at Napoli?

Did every club want them kicked out in the name of sporting integrity 

More or less, Fiorentina was another mentioned. Both went bankrupt and company was restarted in 4th tier odd. 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Take reid out of parkhead and whyte out of Ibrox and it could all have been so different ... also have to say the culture in the two countries is different it's an advantage to be big in Italy where as in wee Scotland they just hold it against you and start kicking as soon as you're down 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • Upcoming Events

    • 02 March 2024 15:00 Until 17:00
      0  
      Rangers v Motherwell
      Ibrox Stadium
      Scottish Premiership
×
×
  • Create New...