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The Gallant Pioneers


WilliamFyfe
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Visited Stirling for the first time last week and bought " The Gallant Pioneers " book from Waterstones as it was highly recommended on here. It was also already signed by the author.

Who else has read it on here? :pipe:

Im going to start some of it tomorrow can't wait. :)

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I haven't got it yet, but I have just started reading "Temple of Dreams" and I am very impressed so far.

It might make me a little more conscious of the approach roads to the Kingston Bridge from the south side now that I know it passes directly overhead from one of our first grounds.

I will be buying "The Gallant Pioneers" or probably end up getting it at Christmas, as these books are a great source of history and reference about our past, especially our humble beginnings which is the greatest rags to riches story anywhere in sport.

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Read it on holiday last week. Fascinating stuff and a little bit sad at times when discovering what happened to the founders :(

Insists Rangers were formed in 1872 NOT 1873. I think to a true Glaswegian it would be even better to read as a lot of the book discusses local geographical and social issues around at the time. (tu)

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Read it on holiday last week. Fascinating stuff and a little bit sad at times when discovering what happened to the founders :(

Insists Rangers were formed in 1872 NOT 1873. I think to a true Glaswegian it would be even better to read as a lot of the book discusses local geographical and social issues around at the time. (tu)

I found it a very interesting book, and it's great to see actual confirmation of the 1872 versus 1873. I've always used 1872 anyway, and it's great that 100 years later, we won the ECWC (tu)

Something i can't remember being mentioned in the book, but is relevant to the bit they mention about John Allan changing the date from 1872 to 1873, was that Allan also printed the team names wrong under the 1877 photo, and from 1923 onwards the players were wrongly named in alot of media and other places, because of it. Some of course still knew which one was Moses etc, but i kept seeing (and thought myself) that Peter Campbell was Moses, when infact, the guy sat to the right of him was.

I found it very interesting to see more pictures of them all through the years, Moses with his bowler hat, and again, playing for the 'Glasgow' team (i'm guessing no such team exists anymore), Tom Vallance all grey, and wiser pictured in his later years, and some of the other items in there are fantastic, pictures of the invitation cards Vallance sent out to members for the anniversary dinner, (i'd love to be able to get ahold of one of those), and a whole lot more.

Another thing i really enjoyed about the book, was the searching for the spots in Glasgow where Rangers founders, or Club were in the early years, and i'm amazed there isn't any photos of Kinning Park (itself) or many more than 1 or 2 of the very first Ibrox (1887). I WILL find one someday ;)

Intertwine all of that with the great research done by David Mason and Gary Ralston, the book gives us a great insight into something that otherwise only held down one or two pages (or even paragraphs in some books) of text, and finally, the founders of our great club get the story they deserve.

Am i the only one that thinks it would make a cracking (british) movie story? I'd love to see it.

Even though the book goes into so much detail, it has only moistened my appetite for more researching into our founders, and the early years of our club, and it'll be something i spend my life doing, every so often, here and there.

Before i asked Toffs to make the 1877 shirt, i thought to myself, there must be ONE somewhere, SURELY! Just imagine, every team member has one there, (same goes for any of the early shirts from 1873 - 1900's) and they would have been kept, passed down, or left in an attic somewhere. I can bet there is someone, somewhere, sitting with one in the roof of their tennament buildings attic, not knowing at all.

I can also just imagine the amount of early Rangers 'artifacts' around glasgow, unbeknown to be anyone, sitting in attics, or boxes, in the back of a cupboard, or basement..

Fantastic book, something that i had been waiting to read since i first gained interest in the early history of our club, and something that has just inspired me more to get out there and research it more.

9/10 from me.

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Read it on holiday last week. Fascinating stuff and a little bit sad at times when discovering what happened to the founders :(

Insists Rangers were formed in 1872 NOT 1873. I think to a true Glaswegian it would be even better to read as a lot of the book discusses local geographical and social issues around at the time. (tu)

I found it a very interesting book, and it's great to see actual confirmation of the 1872 versus 1873. I've always used 1872 anyway, and it's great that 100 years later, we won the ECWC (tu)

Something i can't remember being mentioned in the book, but is relevant to the bit they mention about John Allan changing the date from 1872 to 1873, was that Allan also printed the team names wrong under the 1877 photo, and from 1923 onwards the players were wrongly named in alot of media and other places, because of it. Some of course still knew which one was Moses etc, but i kept seeing (and thought myself) that Peter Campbell was Moses, when infact, the guy sat to the right of him was.

I found it very interesting to see more pictures of them all through the years, Moses with his bowler hat, and again, playing for the 'Glasgow' team (i'm guessing no such team exists anymore), Tom Vallance all grey, and wiser pictured in his later years, and some of the other items in there are fantastic, pictures of the invitation cards Vallance sent out to members for the anniversary dinner, (i'd love to be able to get ahold of one of those), and a whole lot more.

Another thing i really enjoyed about the book, was the searching for the spots in Glasgow where Rangers founders, or Club were in the early years, and i'm amazed there isn't any photos of Kinning Park (itself) or many more than 1 or 2 of the very first Ibrox (1887). I WILL find one someday ;)

Intertwine all of that with the great research done by David Mason and Gary Ralston, the book gives us a great insight into something that otherwise only held down one or two pages (or even paragraphs in some books) of text, and finally, the founders of our great club get the story they deserve.

Am i the only one that thinks it would make a cracking (british) movie story? I'd love to see it.

Even though the book goes into so much detail, it has only moistened my appetite for more researching into our founders, and the early years of our club, and it'll be something i spend my life doing, every so often, here and there.

Before i asked Toffs to make the 1877 shirt, i thought to myself, there must be ONE somewhere, SURELY! Just imagine, every team member has one there, (same goes for any of the early shirts from 1873 - 1900's) and they would have been kept, passed down, or left in an attic somewhere. I can bet there is someone, somewhere, sitting with one in the roof of their tennament buildings attic, not knowing at all.

I can also just imagine the amount of early Rangers 'artifacts' around glasgow, unbeknown to be anyone, sitting in attics, or boxes, in the back of a cupboard, or basement..

Fantastic book, something that i had been waiting to read since i first gained interest in the early history of our club, and something that has just inspired me more to get out there and research it more.

9/10 from me.

Great stuff mate and wonderful to see a younger person show so much interest in our history. (tu)

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I believe 1873 was the year Rangers actually became a 'proper' company. Def. founded in 1872.

Coops, we're going to have to come up with better than that (sorry to sound snotty, and don't take offence, but this is a bugbear of mine). The overwhelming weight of evidence suggests Rangers were founded/formed in 1872, end of story. This 'proper company' 'established' in 1873 etc etc is a load of nonsense that has been allowed to build without anyone thinking what it actually means. What evidence do you have that Rangers became a 'proper' company in 1873 and how are you defining 'proper'? And how are you defining 'company'? On top of that, how were they any more of a 'proper' company in 1873 than they were in 1872? Rangers were basically a boys' club and they quickly organised themselves but the earliest member card so far ever uncovered is from 1874-75 (most likely the first), which shows the committee structure in place at that time. Unless you can provide evidence to the contrary, this talk of becoming a 'proper' company in 1873 is meaningless. Rant over! :)

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